Armstrong Whitworth AW.171

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

AW.171
Role Experimental aircraft
Manufacturer Armstrong Whitworth
Status cancelled
Number built none

The Armstrong Whitworth AW.171 was a British project of the 1950s to develop a supersonic VTOL flying wing aircraft. It was planned to investigate the extremely low aspect ratio delta wings proposed by Professor A.A. Griffith for supersonic transports. The A.W.171 design was a very slender delta flying wing powered by two Bristol Orpheus turbojets mounted at the wingtips, with 10 Rolls-Royce RB.108 lift jets. The pilot was to lie in a prone position to minimise drag.[1] Work was cancelled in 1957 before a prototype was completed.

Specification[edit]

Data from Paper Planes:Armstrong Whitworth's unbuilt projects[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 70 ft 10 in (21.59 m)
  • Wingspan: 17 ft 7 in (5.36 m)
  • Gross weight: 17,500 lb (7,938 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Bristol Orpheus turbojet, 4,850 lbf (21.6 kN) thrust each
  • Powerplant: 10 × Rolls-Royce RB108 turbojet (lift jets), 2,100 lbf (9.3 kN) thrust each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 1,534.54 mph (2,470 km/h; 1,333 kn)
  • Maximum speed: Mach 2.0

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Williams 1991, pp. 72–73.
  • Williams, Ray. "Paper Planes:Armstrong Whitworth's unbuilt projects". Air Enthusiast, Forty-three, 1991. ISSN 0143-5450. pp. 60–79.

External links[edit]