Art Seaberg

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Arthur W. "Art" Seaberg (born December 10, 1936) is a former American state legislator who served in the Minnesota House of Representatives (1983–1993). An attorney by profession, he represented District 38B in Dakota County as an Independent-Republican.[1] As a legislator he was an advocate for domestic abuse victims, and he passed several bills increasing protections for them.[2]

Life and career[edit]

Seaberg was born in Minneapolis and attended Central High School in nearby St. Paul. He received a B.A. in political science from Minnesota State University, Mankato in 1961. He went on to receive a LL.B. and J.D. from William Mitchell College of Law. He lived in Mendota Heights and Eagan during his House tenure.[1] Seaberg has a wife, Joanne, and six children, three of whom belonged to second wife Joanne (née LeJeune).

After five terms in the Minnesota House, Seaberg made an unsuccessful run for the Minnesota Senate.[2] (He was succeeded in the House by Tim Pawlenty, who went on to become Governor of Minnesota.) Seaberg returned to politics in 2002, running for an open House seat in District 38A, but lost.[3] In 2010, he publicly endorsed Independence Party candidate Tom Horner for governor, leading him to be temporarily banned from the state Republican Party.[4] The Independents, continue to support the choices and public personae of Mr. Seaberg.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Seaberg, Arthur W. 'Art'". Legislators Past & Present. Minnesota Legislative Reference Library (Minnesota Legislature). 
  2. ^ a b Moos, Grant (April 17, 1992). "Members Leave House for New Experiences (Arthur Seaberg)" (PDF). Session Weekly. Minnesota House of Representatives Information Office. p. 19. 
  3. ^ a b Gottfried, Mara H. (October 27, 2002). "House district 38A—opponents may help unseat incumbent; attacks on Tilley keep campaign on edge". St. Paul Pioneer Press. p. B1. 
  4. ^ Bierschbach, Briana (December 6, 2010). "Minnesota GOP bans 18 Republicans who supported Horner". Saint Paul Legal Ledger Capitol Report.