Governor of Minnesota

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Governor of Minnesota
Seal of Minnesota-alt.png
Mark Dayton official photo.jpg
Incumbent
Mark Dayton

since January 3, 2011
Style The Honorable
Residence Minnesota Governor's Residence
Term length Four years, no term limit
Formation May 24, 1858
Deputy Tina Smith
Salary $120,303 (2013)[1]
Website http://www.governor.state.mn.us/
Seal of Minnesota-alt.png
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Minnesota
Constitution

The Governor of Minnesota is the chief executive of the U.S. state of Minnesota, leading the state's executive branch. Forty different people have been governor of Minnesota, though historically there were also three governors of Minnesota Territory. Alexander Ramsey, the first territorial governor, also served as state governor several years later. State governors are elected to office by popular vote, but territorial governors were appointed to the office by the United States president. The current governor of Minnesota is Mark Dayton of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL).

Powers and qualifications[edit]

Like the U.S. President, the governor has veto power over bills passed by the Minnesota State Legislature. As in most states, but unlike the U.S. President, the governor can also make line-item vetoes, where specific provisions in bills can be stripped out while allowing the overall bill to be signed into law.

The governor of Minnesota must be 25 years old upon assuming office, and must have been a Minnesota resident for one year before the election.

Since a 1958 amendment to the Minnesota Constitution governors are elected to four-year terms. Previously, they served two-year terms. There is no term limit for governor of the state.[2]

Cabinet[edit]

The governor has a cabinet consisting of the leaders of various state departments. The governor appoints these department heads, who, other than the head of the Department of Military Affairs and the chairs of the Metropolitan Council and the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission, are called commissioners. Cabinet members include:[3]

Cabinet
Office Incumbent Term began
Commissioner of Administration Matt Massman August 25, 2014
Commissioner of Agriculture David Frederickson January 3, 2011
Commissioner of Commerce Mike Rothman January 12, 2011
Commissioner of Corrections Thomas Roy January 31, 2011
Commissioner of Education Dr. Brenda Cassellius January 6, 2015
Commissioner of Employment and Economic Development Shawntera Hardy April 25, 2016
Commissioner of Health Dr. Edward Ehlinger January 14, 2011
Commissioner of the Minnesota Office of Higher Education Larry Pogemiller November 8, 2011
Commissioner of the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency Mary Tingerthal February 1, 2011
Commissioner of Human Rights Kevin Lindsey March 2, 2011
Commissioner of Human Services Emily Johnson Piper December 14, 2015
Commissioner of the Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation Board Mark Phillips January 19, 2015
Commissioner and Chief Information Officer of MN.IT Services Thomas Baden January 14, 2015
Commissioner of Labor and Industry Ken Peterson January 3, 2011
Commissioner of Management and Budget Myron Frans January 5, 2015
Commissioner of the Minnesota Bureau of Mediation Services Todd Doncavage June 19, 2017
Chairwoman of the Metropolitan Council Alene Tchourumoff June 27, 2017
Adjutant General Maj. Gen. Jon Jensen November 4, 2017
Commissioner of Natural Resources Thomas Landwehr January 6, 2011
Commissioner of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency John Linc Stine May 14, 2014
Commissioner of Public Safety Ramona Dohman March 1, 2011
Commissioner of Revenue Cynthia Bauerly January 5, 2015
Commissioner of Transportation Charlie Zelle January 15, 2013
Commissioner of Veterans Affairs Maj. Gen. Larry Shellito January 13, 2011

Residence[edit]

The Minnesota Governor's Residence is located in Saint Paul, at 1006 Summit Avenue.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CSG Releases 2013 Governor Salaries". The Council of State Governments. June 25, 2013. Retrieved November 23, 2014. 
  2. ^ "The Green Papers: Minnesota 2006 Midterm Election". Richard E. Berg-Andersson, Research and Commentary. Retrieved 2008-09-05. 
  3. ^ Governor's Cabinet

External links[edit]