Arthur Bunting

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Arthur Bunting
Personal information
Born (1936-06-13)13 June 1936
Hemsworth district, England
Died 7 June 2017(2017-06-07) (aged 80)
Playing information
Position Scrum-half
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1959–68 Hull Kingston Rovers 231+6 68 1 0 206
Coaching information
Club
Years Team Gms W D L W%
1968–78 Hull Kingston Rovers
1978–85 Hull F.C.
Total 0 0 0 0

Arthur Bunting (13 June 1936 – 7 June 2017)[1] was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s, and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s, playing at club level for Hull Kingston Rovers, as a Scrum-half/Halfback, i.e. number 7, and coaching at club level for Hull Kingston Rovers, and Hull F.C.

Playing career[edit]

Arthur Bunting grew up in a hot bed of rugby league in the Featherstone/Pontefract area, he played for Hull Kingston Rovers and went on to coach them.

Coaching career[edit]

In December 1978, he was offered the chance to coach Hull F.C. Under Bunting, Hull won all the game's major trophies and repeatedly featured in finals, as well as creating a world record, when in winning the Second Division title in 1978–79 they won all of their 26 league games, an achievement never done before or since, he was coach of Hull until 1985.,[2]

Challenge Cup Final appearances[edit]

Arthur Bunting was the coach in Hull F.C.'s 5-10 defeat by Hull Kingston Rovers in the 1980 Challenge Cup Final during the 1979–80 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 3 May 1980, in front of a crowd of 95,000, was the coach in the 14-14 draw with Widnes in the 1982 Challenge Cup Final during the 1981–82 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 1 May 1982, in front of a crowd of 92,147, and in the 18-9 victory over Widnes in the 1982 Challenge Cup Final replay during the 1981–82 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Wednesday 19 May 1982, in front of a crowd of 41,171.[3] and was the coach in the24-28 defeat by Wigan in the 1985 Challenge Cup Final during the 1984–85 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 4 May 1985, in front of a crowd of 99,801,[4] in what is regarded as the most marvellous cup final in living memory,[5] which Hull narrowly lost after fighting back from 12-28 down at half-time.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  2. ^ "Coaches and Captains". hullfc.com. 31 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 
  3. ^ "A complete history of Hull FC's Challenge Cup finals". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014. 
  4. ^ "1984–1985 Challenge Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  5. ^ "100 years of rugby league: From the great divide to the Super era". independent.co.uk. 20 August 1995. Retrieved 1 January 2017. 

External links[edit]