Arthur Dobrin

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Arthur Dobrin (born 1943) is an American author, Professor Emeritus of Management, Entrepreneurship, and General Business at Hofstra University,[1] and Leader Emeritus of the Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island.[2]

Prior to his career, Arthur Dobrin served two years in the Peace Corps with his wife, Lyn, in Kenya.[3] There he was in charge of the educational component of the Kisii District office of the Department of Cooperative Development. He has maintained his interest in Kenya since, having returned with his family and having led educational safaris to Kenya for Adelphi University School of Social Work. He has published two novels, a collection of short stories and a book of poems all set in Kenya. He and Lyn direct the Kenya Project, a program that provides funding for an elementary school in Kisii.[4]

Education[edit]

Arthur Dobrin graduated attended the City College of New York graduating with a BA in History in 1964, received an MA from NYU in 1974, and received a DSW from Adelphi University in 1988.

Career[edit]

Upon returning home from Africa in 1967, Dobrin joined the Ethical Movement and in 1968 became the Leader of the Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island and served in that position until 2001.[5] Dobrin joined Hofstra University's faculty as an adjunct Associate Professor of Social Sciences in 1989 and taught classes in African literature, social work, moral education, religion and human rights in the New College. He joined the faculty of the School for University Studies as a full-time Professor of Humanities in 1989 and taught in the freshmen program. He retired from full professorship in December 2012. He teaches courses in business ethics in the MBA program in School of Business and journalism ethics in the School of Communication as an adjunct professor.[1]

Dobrin has also been a visiting scholar at Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, China; Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Kisii College, Kisii, Kenya; the Gusii Technical College, Kisii, Kenya; and Claflin University in South Carolina.

Dobrin currently lives in Westbury, New York with his wife, Lyn. He has three children - Eric, Kori, and Millie - and three grandchildren - MacKenzie, Ryan, and Jordan.

Author[edit]

Arthur Dobrin has authored, co-authored and edited more than 20 books, including books in ethics and children's books including Spelling God with Two O's, Ethics for Everyone: How to Improve Your Moral Intelligence, and Business Ethics: The Right Way to Riches. He is also the author of more than 100 poems and articles that have appeared in journals, magazines and newspapers.[6] He is also an expert and has a weekly blog on Psychology today called Am I right which explores thoughts and opinions on how to live an ethical life.[7] Together with his wife Lyn, they also write about honeymoons and romantic travel.[8]

Awards[edit]

He is the recipient of Hofstra University's Scholar's Incentive Award, Hofstra University, Allison Kim Levy Continuing Acts of Kindness Memorial Award of the Psychology Department, and the Peter E. Herman Award, for creative work in the literary arts.

Bibliography[edit]

  • The Harder Right: Stories of Conscience and Choice (Argo Navis 2013)
  • The Lost Art of Happiness (Buffalo NY: Prometheus Press 2011)
  • Good for Business: Ethics in the Marketplace (Mumbai: Hindi Granth Karyalay 2006)
  • The Lost Art of Happiness ( Mumbai Hindi Granth Karyalay 2006)
  • Poems Are Not as Beautiful (Merrick: Cross-Cultural Communications 2006)
  • Seeing through Africa (Merrick, NY: Cross-Cultural Communications 2004)
  • Religious Ethics: A Sourcebook (Mumbai: Hindi Granth Karyalay 2003)
  • Ethics for Everyone: How to Improve Your Moral Intelligence (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2002)
  • Teaching Right from Wrong: 40 Things You Can Do To Raise a Moral Child (Beijing: CITIC Publishing House translated into Chinese 2002)
  • Teaching Right from Wrong: 40 Things You Can Do To Raise a Moral Child (New York: Berkeley Publishing Group 2001)
  • Tea in a Blue Cup (Merrick, NY: Cross-Cultural Communications 1999)
  • Love Your Neighbor: Stories of Values and Virtues (New York: Scholastic, Inc. 1998)
  • After Uhuru: Kenya Stories (Merrick, NY: Cross-Cultural Communications 1998)
  • Malaika (Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta Foundation 1998)
  • Ethical People and How They Get To Be That Way (New York: Ethica Press/Cross-Cultural Communications 1998)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Dobrin, Arthur. "Faculty Bios". Hofstra University. Retrieved 19 July 2013. 
  2. ^ Dobrin, Arthur. "Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island". Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island. Retrieved 19 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Long Island Computers En Route to Africa". Westbury Times. 13 December 2002. Archived from the original on 2 October 2013. Retrieved 19 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Sema Academy". Retrieved 19 July 2013. 
  5. ^ Burghardt, Linda F. (May 27, 2001). "Ethical Humanism: Religion Without God". The New York Times. Retrieved 19 July 2013. 
  6. ^ Molotsky, Irvin (April 9, 1979). "Musings of Local Poets to Greet Hardened Riders of the L.I.R.R". The New York Times. Retrieved 19 July 2013. 
  7. ^ Dobrin, Arthur. "Psychology Today Experts". Psychology Today. Retrieved 19 July 2013. 
  8. ^ "Honeymoons/Romantic Travel". About.com. Retrieved 19 July 2013.