Austrocochlea porcata

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Austrocochlea porcata
Austrocochlea porcata thin striped.jpg
Thin striped variant
Austrocochlea porcata wide striped.jpg
Wide striped variant
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Mollusca
Class: Gastropoda
Clade: Vetigastropoda
Superfamily: Trochoidea
Family: Trochidae
Genus: Austrocochlea
Species: A. porcata
Binomial name
Austrocochlea porcata
(A. Adams, 1853)
Synonyms
  • Austrocochlea zebra Menke, K.T., 1829
  • Labio porcata A. Adams, 1851 (original description)
  • Monodonta zebra var. porcata (A. Adams, 1853)
  • Trochus extenuatus Fischer, 1876
  • Trochus taeniatus Quoy, H.E.T. & J.P. Gaimard, 1834

The zebra top snail, scientific name Austrocochlea porcata, is a medium-sized sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusc in the family Trochidae, the top snails, also known as top shells.[1]

Shell description[edit]

The size of the shell varies between 20 mm and 43 mm. The shell has a black-and-white banded pattern overlying a light grey to white shell. It is very similar to that of the southern ribbed top snail, Austrocochlea constricta, and until recently the two species were considered to be identical. The aperture is less dilated, than in Austrocochlea constricta. The columellar tubercle is obsolete.[2]

Distribution[edit]

This marine species is endemic to Australia and occurs off Central Queensland to West Australia and also off Tasmania.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bouchet, P. (2013). Austrocochlea porcata (A. Adams, 1853). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=546941 on 2014-03-16
  2. ^ Tryon (1889), Manual of Conchology XI, Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia
  • Life on Australian Seashores - www.mesa.edu.au
  • Donald K.M., Kennedy M. & Spencer H.G. (2005) The phylogeny and taxonomy of austral monodontine topshells (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Trochidae), inferred from DNA sequences. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 37: 474-483