Azabon

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Azabon
Azabon molecular structure.png
Identifiers
  • 4-(3-Azabicyclo[3.2.2]non-3-ylsulfonyl)aniline
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC14H20N2O2S
Molar mass280.386
3D model (JSmol)
  • c1cc(ccc1N)S(=O)(=O)N2CC3CCC(C2)CC3
  • InChI=1S/C14H20N2O2S/c15-13-5-7-14(8-6-13)19(17,18)16-9-11-1-2-12(10-16)4-3-11/h5-8,11-12H,1-4,9-10,15H2
  • Key:RQBNXPJPWKUTOG-UHFFFAOYSA-N

  • InChI=1/C14H20N2O2S/c15-13-5-7-14(8-6-13)19(17,18)16-9-11-1-2-12(10-16)4-3-11/h5-8,11-12H,1-4,9-10,15H2
  • Key:RQBNXPJPWKUTOG-UHFFFAOYAL

Azabon is a central nervous system stimulant[1] of the sulfonamide class[2] that is also used as a nootropic.[3] As it is a sulpha drug, care must be taken during administration, and certain individuals must avoid azabon altogether to prevent an allergic reaction. Despite being a sulfonamide, azabon has poor antibacterial potency, although this decreased activity is common among other benzenesulfonamides with two substituents on N1. Azabon is synthesized from 3-azabicyclo-[2.2.2]nonane, which is itself prepared by pyrolysis of aliphatic diamine.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mathews SM, Jiju V, Thomas I, Panicker JT, Kuriakose LS (2015-07-28). "Sulfa drugs and the skin" (PDF). World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research. 4 (10): 382–390. ISSN 2277-7105.
  2. ^ WO 2011089215, Vetter D, Rau H, "Dipeptide-based prodrug linkers for aromatic amine-containing drugs", published 28 July 2011, assigned to Ascendis Pharma AS 
  3. ^ Mao F, Ni W, Xu X, Wang H, Wang J, Ji M, Li J (January 2016). "Chemical Structure-Related Drug-Like Criteria of Global Approved Drugs". Molecules. 21 (1): 75. doi:10.3390/molecules21010075. PMC 6273477. PMID 26771590.
  4. ^ Lednicer D, Mitscher LA (1980). The Organic Chemistry of Drug Synthesis (PDF). Vol. 2. Wiley Interscience. p. 115. ISBN 0-471-04392-3.