Basex

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This article is about Basex firm. For BaseX XML Database, see BaseX.

Basex is an IT research and consulting firm that focuses on knowledge management, information management, and collaboration issues and technologies within larger organizations. Founded in 1983, it was known as The Basex Group until 2001.

Basex, Inc.
Privately held
Industry Research
Founded 1983
Headquarters New York City
Products Research
Consulting
Website www.basex.com

History[edit]

Basex, which was founded in 1983 as The Basex Group, first started by advising companies on how to understand and leverage the newly-deregulated telecommunications environment that came about as a result of the Bell System divestiture.[1] The divestiture allowed telecommunications companies expand to new fields and to develop and offer more deregulated services which in turn supported the Information Age and the Knowledge Economy. Since only the largest companies had, up until that point, had undergone computerization, smaller companies needed advisory services and guidance as they entered this new era, a role that Basex and other companies would undertake.

Research[edit]

Basex provides market research, competitive intelligence, and management consulting to various companies.[2] The company writes a great deal about information overload as being a problem for businesses and indicates it focuses on the problem in its research.

Basex primarily focuses on how companies and knowledge workers use knowledge management and collaboration technologies and techniques.

Basex says it began concentrating on information overload in the early 1990s. Basex has undertaken various research studies on the subject and maintains that the problem costs the U.S. economy about $900 billion annually.[3]

Criticism[edit]

Two articles in the Wall Street Journal (in 2008) and Slate (in 2006) questioned certain aspects of Basex's findings on interruptions although both writers acknowledged that the problem of information overload that Basex was calling attention to was important.[4][5] Since those two articles appeared, the Wall Street Journal and multiple other publications, including the New York Times, Financial Times, Die Presse, and Business Week, along with numerous more specialized publications, have used Basex's research on information overload as the foundation for a story on information overload.[6][7][8][9][10]

Competitors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Telecommunications Industry Undergoing Significant Change, Crains New York Business, August 1, 1985
  2. ^ Basex Research and Advisory Services Archived May 6, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  3. ^ New York Times: Read This and Cost Your Company Dough
  4. ^ "Don’t Let This Blog Post Interrupt You" in the Wall Street Journal, July 23, 2008
  5. ^ Meron, Jeff. "Workus Interruptus." March 16, 2006 Slate
  6. ^ "Don't You Dare Email This Story." The Wall Street Journal. May 17, 2009.
  7. ^ Richtel, Matt. "Read This and Cost Your Company Dough." The New York Times. December 22, 2008.
  8. ^ Nuttall, Chris. "Lotus Notes Seeks Apple Cool." Financial Times. January 6, 2009.
  9. ^ Jackson, Maggie. "May We Have Your Attention, Please?" Business Week. June 12, 2008 Archived April 27, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  10. ^ "Wieviel surfende Mitarbeiter Unternehmen kosten." Die Presse. December 12, 2008

External links[edit]