Bernard Khoury

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Bernard Khoury (born August 19, 1968 in Beirut, Lebanon) is a Lebanese architect. Khalil Khouri, a Lebanese architect and designer who worked with exposed concrete and designer of the Mont La Salle School Campus, the Municipal Stadium of Jounieh and the Interdesign Showroom building, is his father.[1][2][3][4]

Background[edit]

Khoury’s father produced work at differing scales ranging from the design and production of furniture items to his participation in the development of the master plan for the reconstruction of the Beirut Central District in 1977.[1]

Bernard Khoury lived in and out of Lebanon during the early years of the Civil War where he scarcely made it through secondary school, before pursuing his architectural studies in the United States of America, where he received his Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1990 and Bachelor of Architecture in 1991 from the Rhode Island School of Design, followed by a Masters in Architectural Studies in 1993 from Harvard University.[5]

Career[edit]

Khoury started his professional career soon after his graduate studies in post-war Beirut, which became his territory of experimentation where he produced 16 unbuilt projects spanning a period of four years (1993-1997).[5] During the early years of his practice, he was financially supported by his family’s furniture manufacturing business that provided him with a design studio and gave him access to the workshop and manufacturing facilities of their factories.[5]

Khoury first came to public and critical attention with the completion of the B018 music club in 1998, his first built project.[5][6] This building sparked a string of temporary projects, through which Khoury built a reputation for his ability to produce critical interventions in problematic zones.[7] These include his first six built projects: the Centrale project (2000),[8][9][10][11] Yabani (2001),[8][10][12][13] the BLC Bank (2004), the Bank of Beirut pavilion in Chtaura (2005),[12][14][15] as well as the Black Box (2005).[10][12] In the media, various publications dubbed Khoury "the bad boy" of architecture in the Middle East.[16][17]

Khoury's early clients came primarily from the entertainment industry. He then produced projects for local banks.[5][17]

His first international commission, the Pfefferberg Project, was in Berlin, Germany (1999-2001) and consisted of the conversion of an industrial block into a cultural quarter. Aborted commissions followed in Europe, including the Santa Cesarea project in Italy (2007), as well as residential projects in England, Spain and Serbia.[18] He then worked on commissions such as the Tumo Center for Creative Technologies (2011), the Tumo Park (2011) and the Epygi Park Master Plan (2013) in Yerevan, Armenia, as well as the AGBU NKR Campus (2014) in Nagorno-Karabakh.[19][20][21][22]

He has also worked in the Arab world.[23] These comprise schemes in the Persian Gulf region, such as the Fintas Market (2003)[10][15] and the Andalus Development (2006)[14][15] in Kuwait; the Alargan Business Bay Development (2006)[15] and the Ajman Resort (2012-2013)[23] in the United Arab Emirates; Al Qurm Mixed Use Development (2012)[24] in Oman; Surramanraa (2005)[8][10][14][25] in Riyadh; and the Suspended Gardens of Manama (2011)[23] in Bahrain.

Khoury’s first permanent building, IB3, was completed in 2006.[26][27][28] IB3 was followed by Plot # 732 (2008),[13][29] Plot # 183 (2009)[30][31] and Plot # 893 (2010),[13][31] all of which engage their surrounding urban fabric. These were followed by the developments on Plots # 1314 and 2251 (2013) in Beirut, in which Khoury designed his own residence.[17] Plot # 4371 (2009), a more recent residential project, allows its inhabitants to move their vehicles vertically within the buildings to park them in the center of their living room.[10][23][31] Plot # 1282 (2010, also known as Factory Lofts) is characterized by its thin slabs and openness on all orientations, stretching over 166 meters in length with a perimeter of 430 linear meters.[32][33] Plot # 1072 (2009, also known as the Skyline),[34] Plot # 1342 (2010, also known as the Paramount)[35] and Plot # 450 (2014, also known as the Grand Hotel de Beirut)[36] are high rise residential developments.

On a smaller scale, a number of Khoury's projects were produced mainly in the mountainous regions of Lebanon, including Plot # 7950 (2010), which houses 52 engines that operate its retractable roof, and Plot # 4328 (2010) with an accessible inclined façade culminating in a linear lap pool.[13][37]

Academic[edit]

Khoury has taught at the American University of Beirut (1994, 1995, 2003, 2010), École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (2008) and l’Ecole Speciale d’Architecture in Paris (2011-2012). He is co-founder of the Arab Center for Architecture.[38][39][40][41][42][43][44]

Experimental[edit]

  • 2013 - C’était un Rendez-vous [commissioned for group show at Centro Cultural Del Mexico Contemporaneo] Mexico City, Mexico[45]
  • 2012 - I Wish I Could Make Them All Look Like You [commissioned for "Confessions" group show] Beirut, Lebanon[46][47][48][49]
  • 2010 - Derailing Beirut [commissioned for "Spazzio" opening show of the MAXXI Museum] Rome, Italy[50][51]
  • 2009 - Catherine Wants to Know [commissioned for solo show at the Beirut Art Center] Beirut, Lebanon[52][53]
  • 2008 - P.O.W 08 [commissioned for "YOU Prison" group show at Sandretto Foundation] Torino, Italy[54][55]
  • 2006 - SS / DW [commissioned for "Moving Homes" group show at Sfeir-Semler Gallery] Beirut, Lebanon[56]
  • 1991 - Evolving Scars [Harvard University] Cambridge, U.S.A.[10][12][14]

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Khalil Khoury: Interdesign, Beirut". Abitare. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  2. ^ Trad, Andre. "The Legacy of Modern Architecture in Beirut, 1950-1975". Worldview. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  3. ^ Pelgrim, Richard. "Hamra Modern" (PDF). AUB. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  4. ^ Foppiano, Anna (September 2012). "Bernard Khoury: Plot # 10283, Kferdebian". Abitare: 56–63. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Ouroussoff, Nicolai (May 21, 2006). "Middle-East Pieces". The New York Times: Section 6,. 
  6. ^ Trelcat, Sophie (November 2011). "Centrale: Penser les blessures de guerre". L'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui: 90–94. 
  7. ^ Elkann, Ginevra (July 2012). "Beirut Non Dorme Mai". Wired (41): 144. 
  8. ^ a b c Vedado, Obel (Spring 2008). "Ligne Libanaise". Citizen K (France): 184–191. 
  9. ^ Della Casa, Francesco (March 2011). "Restauration en Conflit". TRACÉS: 21–24. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g Calzavara, Michele (2011). "Crossover architects - Bernard Khoury". Inventario (02): 126–141. 
  11. ^ Trelcat, Sophie (November 2011). "Centrale: Penser les blessures de guerre". L'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui: 90–94. 
  12. ^ a b c d Elena, Franzoia (February 2008). "Meccanismi Per La Visione In Territori Di Confine". Ottagono: 164–173. 
  13. ^ a b c d Malzeme, Gorsel (September 2012). "Beyrutlu Mimar: Bernard Khoury/DW5". Mimarlik: 44–61. 
  14. ^ a b c d Ulbrich Obrist, Hans (September–October 2007). "A Volatile Fabric". DAMn (13): 32–38. 
  15. ^ a b c d Zacks, Stephen (July–August 2007). "The Discreet Charm of Bernard Khoury". Metropolis: 82–89, 127, 129. 
  16. ^ "Bernard Khoury - Bad Boy of Architecture". Kontaktmag. Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  17. ^ a b c Brooke, Anderson (December 2013). "An Architect Turns His Back on the Sea". The Wall Street Journal: M3. 
  18. ^ "Santa Cesarea". Dromos: 194–199. 2010. 
  19. ^ "Our Facilities". Tumo Center. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  20. ^ "TUMO Center for Creative Technologies". Architizer. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  21. ^ "TUMO Park". Architizer. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  22. ^ "Epygi Park Master Plan". Herskhazeen. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  23. ^ a b c d Al-Omary Fiorello, Christopher (October–November 2013). "Rage Against the Machine". Bespoke: 42–49. 
  24. ^ a b Carcano, Francesco (March 2006). "Sounds from the Battlefield". Aria (03): 32–45. 
  25. ^ Archis (2006). "Architecture of Power". Volume. 20 (6): 20–23, 30–3. 
  26. ^ "Bernard Khoury, IB3, Beirut". Abitare: 50–52. July–August 2007. 
  27. ^ Di Domenico, Conrado (2008). "Positive + Negative -". Compasses (2): 112–119. 
  28. ^ Innaccone, Giuliana (April 2009). "Edificio IB3 a Beirut". Arketipo: 96–103. 
  29. ^ "Passaporto di Pace". Ottagono: 20–21, 134–135. February 2009. 
  30. ^ "Aménité Bernard Khoury". L'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui: 149–152. April–May 2010. 
  31. ^ a b c Savorelli, Pietro (February 2012). "Bernard Khoury". Area: 106–127. 
  32. ^ "Factory Lofts". Loft Investments. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  33. ^ Boudisseau, Guillaume. "Nouveaux Projets: Factory Lofts". Le Commerce du Levant. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  34. ^ "The Project: The Skyline". The Skyline Beirut. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  35. ^ "The Paramount". Paramount Beirut. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  36. ^ "Grand Hotel de Beirut (Plot # 450 Saifi)". Archello. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  37. ^ "Plot 7950: Bernard Khoury Architects". Retrieved 25 March 2014. 
  38. ^ Stoughton, India. "Arab Center for Architecture champions Lebanese modernism". The Daily Star. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  39. ^ "Bernard Khoury". The Architectural League of New York. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  40. ^ "Speaker & Talks 2012". TEDx Yerevan. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  41. ^ "Bernard Khoury". MASA Association. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  42. ^ "Bernard Khoury - The Mediterranean: Une Histore de Faussaires". Architecture Fund. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  43. ^ "Open Lecture 2011". Barcelona Institute of Architecture. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  44. ^ Dessimoz, Raphael. "Raphael Dessimoz Architecte". Raphael Dessimoz. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  45. ^ Ciuffi, Valentina. "C'etait Un Rendez-vous". Abitare. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  46. ^ "House of Today - Artisanal Platform by Cherine Magrabi". House of Today. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  47. ^ "House of Today - Bernard Khoury". House of Today. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  48. ^ "Confessions: The Secret is Out". Beirut Nighlife. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  49. ^ Taylor, Alex. "Mixing Tradition with Modernity". The Daily Star. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  50. ^ "Bernard Khoury, Derailing Beirut. 1975 2010". MAXXI Museum. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  51. ^ "Remembering is Not Enough: MAXXI Collection". MAXXI Museum. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  52. ^ "Prisoner of War". Beirut Art Center. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  53. ^ Fitzsimmons, Tim (July 28, 2009). "Prisoners of Art: Akram Zaatari and Bernard Khoury at BAC" (PDF). NOW Lebanon. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  54. ^ "YouPrison. Riflessioni Sulla Limitazione di Spazio e Liberta". Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  55. ^ "'You Prison" at Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin". Saatchi Art. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  56. ^ "Previous Exhibitions: Moving Home(s)". Sfeir-Semler Gallery. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  57. ^ "Qurm Gardens (Residential)". ALARGAN. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 
  58. ^ "Awards". ALARGAN. Retrieved 27 March 2014. 

External links[edit]