Bernie Hunhoff

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Bernie Hunhoff
Member of the South Dakota Senate
from the 18th district
In office
January 13, 2015 – January 10, 2017
Preceded byJean Hunhoff
Succeeded byCraig Kennedy
Member of the South Dakota House of Representatives
from the 18th district
In office
January 13, 2009 – January 13, 2015
Serving with Mike Stevens (2013-2015)
Nick Moser (2009-2013)
Preceded byJean Hunhoff
Succeeded byJean Hunhoff
Member of the South Dakota Senate
from the 18th district
In office
January 12, 1993 – January 12, 1999
Preceded byElmer Bietz
Succeeded byGarry Moore
Personal details
Born (1951-09-05) September 5, 1951 (age 67)
Yankton, South Dakota, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Alma materUniversity of South Dakota, Springfield
Mount Marty College

Bernie P. Hunhoff[1] (born September 5, 1951 in South Dakota) is an American politician and a former Democratic member of the South Dakota Senate representing District 18 from 1993 to 1999 and 2015 to 2017. Hunhoff was also a member of the South Dakota House of Representatives for District 18 from 2009 to 2015. He served as the House minority leader during that time.

Hunhoff is also a writer and journalist. He wrote for the Madison Daily Leader and the Watertown Public Opinion in South Dakota before starting his own weekly paper, the Missouri Valley Observer, in 1978. In 1985 he founded South Dakota Magazine, a bimonthly journal that explores the history, culture and geography of the state. He has also authored and co-authored several books, including Uniquely South Dakota, South Dakota Curiosities and South Dakota's Best Stories.

He married Myrna Mulloy in 1974. They have two children, Katie and Christian, and four grandchildren. They live in Yankton.

Education[edit]

Hunhoff attended University of South Dakota-Springfield and earned his BA from Mount Marty College in 1974. He is a 1969 graduate of Yankton High School and attended rural country schools.

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 When incumbent Republican Representative Nick Moser left the Legislature and left a District 18 seat open, Hunhoff ran in the June 5, 2012 Democratic Primary;[2] in the four-way November 6, 2012 General election, Hunhoff took the first seat with 5,589 votes (31.4%) and Republican nominee Mike Stevens took the second seat ahead of Republican nominee Thomas Stotz and Democratic nominee Charlie Gross.[3]
  • 1992 When Senate District 18 incumbent Republican Senator Elmer Bietz left the seat open, Hunhoff ran in the June 2, 1992 Democratic Primary and placed first by 8 votes with 1,074 votes (50.2%), including an election recount that did not change the result;[4] and won the November 3, 1992 General election with 6,349 votes (68.94%) against Republican nominee Clifford Groseth.[5]
  • 1994 Hunhoff was unopposed for both the June 7, 1994 Democratic Primary[6] and the November 8, 1994 General election, winning with 7,024 votes.[7]
  • 1996 Hunhoff was unopposed for both the 1996 Democratic Primary[8] and the November 5, 1996 General election, winning with 7,103 votes.[9]
  • 1998 To challenge incumbent Republican Governor of South Dakota Bill Janklow, Hunhoff won the 1998 Democratic Primary, but lost the November 3, 1998 South Dakota Gubernatorial election to Governor Janklow and his running mate Carole Hillard.[10] Hunhoff's running mate was Elsie Meeks, the first Native American woman to be a nominee for statewide office in the state.
  • 2008 When House District 18 incumbent Republican Representative Charlotte Gilson left the Legislature and left a District 18 seat open, Hunhoff ran in the June 3, 2008 Democratic Primary;[11] in the four-way November 4, 2008 General election Hunhoff took the first seat with 6,014 votes (34%) and Republican nominee Nick Moser took the second seat ahead of incumbent Democratic Representative and former Senator Garry Moore and Republican nominee Daniel Rupiper.[12]
  • 2010 Hunhoff ran in the June 8, 2010 Democratic Primary;[13] in the four-way November 2, 2010 General election, incumbent Republican Representative Moser took the first seat and Hunhoff took the second seat with 4,957 votes (31.9%) ahead of former Representative Charlotte Gilson and fellow Democratic nominee Jay Williams.[14]
  • 2014 Hunhoff ran unopposed in the June 3rd, 2014 Democratic Primary. Hunhoff than ran for the District 18 Senate seat, which was held by his sister-in-law Republican Jean Hunhoff. In the November 4, 2014 General election, Hunhoff defeated Republican nominee Matt Stone; Hunhoff won with 4,300 votes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bernie Hunhoff's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  2. ^ "Official Results Primary Election - June 5, 2012". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  3. ^ "Official Results General Election November 6, 2012". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  4. ^ "1992 South Dakota Legislative Primary Election" (PDF). Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 1, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  5. ^ "1992 General Election for Legislature". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Archived from the original on February 1, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  6. ^ "South Dakota Legislative Primary Election June 7, 1994" (PDF). Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 1, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  7. ^ "1994 General Election for Legislature". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Archived from the original on February 1, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  8. ^ "Primary Election Returns". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  9. ^ "1996 South Dakota General Election Legislative Races". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Archived from the original on February 1, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  10. ^ "1998 General Election Official Canvass Statewide Candidates". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  11. ^ "2008 South Dakota Official Primary Election Results June 3, 2008". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Archived from the original on November 1, 2013. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  12. ^ "2008 South Dakota Official General Election Results Legislature November 4, 2008". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Archived from the original on January 16, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  13. ^ "Official Results Primary Election June 8, 2010". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  14. ^ "2010 South Dakota Official General Election Results Legislature November 2, 2010". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Archived from the original on January 16, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.

External links[edit]

Party political offices
Preceded by
Jim Beddow
Democratic nominee for Governor of South Dakota
1998
Succeeded by
Jim Abbott