Bindone

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Bindone
Bindone.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
[1,2′-Biindenylidene]-1′,3,3′(2H)-trione
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.015.415 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 216-956-9
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C18H10O3/c19-15-9-14(10-5-1-2-6-11(10)15)16-17(20)12-7-3-4-8-13(12)18(16)21/h1-8H,9H2
    Key: YMFDOLAAUHRURP-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • C1C(=C2C(=O)C3=CC=CC=C3C2=O)C4=CC=CC=C4C1=O
Properties
C18H10O3
Molar mass 274.275 g·mol−1
Appearance yellow solid
Density 1.444 g/cm3[1]
Melting point 208–211 °C (406–412 °F; 481–484 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Bindone is an organic compound with the formula C6H4COCH2C=C(CO)2C6H4. A yellowish solid, it is classified as an aromatic triketone.

Bindone is used as a colour test for the detection of primary amines. It turns violet in their presence. Aromatic amines turn this reagent blue.[2]

Bindone can be prepared by the condensation of two equivalents of 1,3-indandione.[3]

Bindone formation from two molecules of 1,3-indandione

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wilbuer, Jennifer; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Esser, Birgit (2016). "Syntheses, Structures and Optoelectronic Properties of Spiroconjugated Cyclic Ketones". European Journal of Organic Chemistry. 2016 (14): 2404–2412. doi:10.1002/ejoc.201600235.
  2. ^ Vecera, Miroslov (2012). Detection and Identification of Organic Compounds. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 319. ISBN 9781468418330.
  3. ^ Sharma, Lalit Kumar; Kim, Kyung Bo; Elliott, Gregory I. (2011). "A selective solvent-free self-condensation of carbonyl compounds utilizing microwave irradiation". Green Chemistry. 13 (6): 1546. doi:10.1039/c1gc15164a.

External links[edit]

  • Media related to Bindone at Wikimedia Commons