Roman Catholic Diocese of Teano-Calvi

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Diocese of Teano-Calvi
Dioecesis Theanensis-Calvensis
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Naples
Statistics
Area 663 km2 (256 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2014)
84,400 (est.)
82,600 (est.) (97.9%)
Parishes 70
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 5th Century
Cathedral Cattedrale di San Giovanni ante Portam Latinam (Teano)
Co-cathedral Concattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta (Calvi)
Secular priests 50 (diocesan)
19 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Arturo Aiello
Website
www.diocesiteanocalvi.it

The Diocese of Teano-Calvi (Latin: Dioecesis Theanensis-Calvensis) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in Campania, southern Italy, created in 1986. It is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Naples. The historic Diocese of Teano and Diocese of Calvi Risorta were united in 1818, forming the diocese of Calvi e Teano.[1][2] In 2014, in the diocese of Teano-Calvi there was one priest for every 1,197 Catholics.

History[edit]

Calvi[edit]

Calvi is the ancient Cales or Calenum, not far from Capua. Towards the end of the fifth century it was certainly a bishopric, since Valerius, Bishop of Calenum, was present at the Roman Council held by Pope Symmachus in 499.[3] Destroyed in the 9th century by the Saracens, it was rebuilt by Atenulf I of Capua, at which time, probably, the see was re-established. It certainly had a bishop at the end of the eleventh century.

Bishops[edit]

Diocese of Calvi Risorta[edit]

Latin Name: Calvensis
Erected: 5th Century

...
  • Odoardo (Eduardus)[4] (1245)
  • Palmerius (? –1253) (transferred to Bojano)
  • Isembardus (1265–1271)
  • Gregorius
  • Landulfus
  • Robertus (died 1291)
  • Henricus (ca. 1291–1301)
  • Petrus (ca. 1301–1311)
  • Fredericus (1311– )
  • Balianus (ca. 1320)
  • Joannes (died 1324)
  • Petrus, O.Min. (1325–1330)
  • Thaddeus de Capua (1330–1332)
  • Joannes de Concivis, O.Min. (1332–ca. 1343)[5][6]
  • Stephanus, O.Carm. (1343–1345)
  • Joannes de Arpino, O.Min. (1345–1348)
  • Petrus de Brina, O.Min. (1349–1362)
  • Rainaldus (1362– )[7]
  • Antonius
  • Robertus
  • Joannes
  • Bartholomaeus (1395–1402)
  • Stephanus Goberno (1402–1413)
  • Antonius Galluzzi (1413–1415)
  • Antonius Del Fede, O.Carm. (1415–1443)
  • Angelus Mazziotti (ca. 1443–ca. 1466)
  • Antonius (1466–1495)
  • Maurilio Giannotti (1495 - 1505 Died)
  • Matteo Orsini (bishop) (8 Nov 1505 - 1512 Died)
  • Giovanni Antonio Gallo (9 Aug 1519 - 1543 Died)
  • Lorenzo Spada, O.F.M. Conv. (1 Jun 1543 - 1544 Died)
  • Berenguer Gombau (27 Oct 1544 - 1551 Died)
  • Gaspare Ricciullo del Fosso, O.M. (22 Apr 1551 - 17 Jul 1560 Appointed, Archbishop of Reggio Calabria)
  • Giulio Magnani, O.F.M. Conv. (17 Jul 1560 - 1566 Died)
  • Paolo Terracino (10 Jun 1566 - 1575 Died)
  • Ascanio Marchesini (23 Sep 1575 - 1580 Died)
  • Scipione Bozzuti (24 Feb 1580 - 14 Feb 1582 Appointed, Bishop of Lucera)
  • Fabio Maranta (5 Mar 1582 - 1619 Died)
  • Gregorio Del Bufalo (8 Apr 1619 - 1623 Died)
  • Gennaro Filomarino, C.R. (18 Dec 1623 - Oct 1650 Died)
  • Francesco Maria Falcucci (19 Dec 1650 - 1661 Died)
  • Vincenzo Carafa (bishop), C.R.L. (8 Aug 1661 - 1679 Died)
  • Vincenzo Maria da Silva, O.P. (10 Apr 1679 - 23 May 1702 Died)
  • Giovanbattista Caracciolo, C.R.S. (15 Jan 1703 - 5 Nov 1714 Died)[8]
  • Filippo Positano (16 Dec 1720 - Dec 1732 Died)
  • Gennaro Maria Danza (2 Mar 1733 - 1740 Died)
  • Giuseppe Barone (29 May 1741 - 12 Jan 1742 Died)
  • Francesco Agnello Fragianni (28 Feb 1742 - Apr 1756 Died)
  • Giuseppe Maria Capece Zurlo, C.R. (24 May 1756 - 16 Dec 1782 Appointed, Archbishop of Naples)
  • Andrea de Lucia (27 Feb 1792 - 1830 Died)

Diocese of Teano[edit]

...
  • Domninus (ca. 555-560)[9]
...
  • Leo (879, 887/888)[10]
  • Hilarius, O.S.B. (860–867)
  • Stephanus
  • Leo, O.S.B. (ca. 879)
  • Angelarius, O.S.B. (ca. 886–889)
  • Landus
  • Sandarius
...
  • Pandulfus, O.S.B. (attested 1122)[11]
  • Petrus (ca. 1171–1192)[12]
  • Theodinus (1193–1227)[13]
...
  • Marinus de Judice (1353–1361) (transferred to Amalfi)[14]
  • Joannes Mutio (1361–1363)
  • Francesco de Messana, O.P. (1363–1369)
  • Thomas de Porta (1369-1372) (transferred to Reggio)[15]
...
  • Martinus Pales de Belinzo (1443-1458)[16]
  • Cardinal Nicolaus Fortiguerra (1458–1473)[17]
  • Orso Orsini (1474–1495)[18]
  • Francisco de Borgia (1495–1531)[19]
  • [Cardinal Giovanni Salviati (1531–1535)] Administrator of the diocese.[20]
  • Antonio Maria Sartori (1535–1556)
  • Hieronymus Nichesola, O.P. (1557-1566)
  • Archangelo Bianchi, O.P. (1566–1575)
...
  • Paolo Squillante (1654–1660)[21]
  • Ottavio Boldoni, Barnabite (1661–1680)[22]
  • Giuseppe Niccolo Giberti (1681–1697)[23]
  • Domenico Pacifico (1698–1717)[24]
  • Giuseppe de Puteo (del Pozzo) (1718–1724)[25]
  • Dominico Cirillo (1724-1746) (transferred to Carinola)[26]
  • Angelo Longo, O.S.B.[27] (1746–1749)
  • Dominico Giordani (1749–1755) (transferred to Nicomedia)
  • Aniello Broya (1755–1767)[28]
  • Giovanni Jacopo Onorati (1768–1777)[29]
  • Filippo Aprile (1777–1792) (transferred to Melfi)
  • Rafael Pasca, O.S.B. (1792–1797)[30]
  • Nicola Vecchi (1797–8 January 1808)[31]

Diocese of Calvi e Teano[edit]

Latin Name: Calvensis et Theanensis
United: 27 June 1818 with Diocese of Teano

  • Giuseppe Maria Pezzella, O.S.A. (1830 - 3 Jan 1833 Died)
  • Giuseppe Trama (20 Jan 1834 Confirmed - 6 Oct 1837 Resigned)
  • Nicola Sterlini (27 Apr 1840 Confirmed - 3 Apr 1860 Died)
  • Bartolomeo D’Avanzo (13 Jul 1860 - 20 Oct 1884 Died)
  • Alfonso Maria Giordano, C.SS.R. (20 Oct 1884 - 16 Dec 1907 Resigned)
  • Albino Pella (19 Aug 1908 - 12 Apr 1915 Appointed, Bishop of Casale Monferrato)
  • Calogero Licata (14 Apr 1916 - 25 Aug 1924 Died)
  • Giuseppe Marcozzi (14 Aug 1926 - 21 Apr 1940 Died)
  • Giacinto Tamburini (6 Mar 1941 - 8 Jan 1944 Died)
  • Vincenzo Bonaventura Medori (17 Jul 1945 - 12 Aug 1950 Died)
  • Giacomo Palombella (3 Jan 1951 - 2 Jul 1954 Appointed, Archbishop of Matera)
  • Matteo Guido Sperandeo (5 Sep 1954 - 17 Aug 1984 Retired)
  • Felice Cece (17 Aug 1984 - 8 Feb 1989 Appointed, Archbishop of Sorrento-Castellammare di Stabia)

Diocese of Teano-Calvi[edit]

Latin Name: Theanensis-Calvensis
Name Changed: 30 September 1986

  • Francesco Tommasiello (15 Jul 1989 - 25 Oct 2005 Died)
  • Arturo Aiello (13 May 2006 - )

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Diocese of Teano-Calvi". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 29 February 2016. 
  2. ^ "Diocese of Calvi" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ Giovan Domenico Mansi (1762). Sacrorum conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio (in Latin). Tomus octavus (8). Venice-Florence: A. Zatta. p. 234. 
  4. ^ Odoardo assisted at the Council of Lyons (1245) and vigorously opposed Emperor Frederick II, his sovereign, who, on his return, had him killed.
  5. ^ "Archbishop Gaspare Ricciullo del Fosso, O.M." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved October 17, 2016
  6. ^ "Archbishop Gaspare Ricciullo Del Fosso, O.M." GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved October 7, 2016
  7. ^ Gams, p. 864.
  8. ^ Caracciolo was twice elected Provincial of the Roman Province of the Somaschi Fathers. Ritzler, V, p. 138, with note 3.
  9. ^ Pope Pelagius I sent a mandate to Bishop Domninus: Paul F. Kehr, Italia pontificia VIII: Regnum Normannorum—Campania(Berlin: Weidmann 1935), p. 256 no. 2.
  10. ^ Pope John VIII wrote to Bishop Leo about disorders in Campania. Pope Stephen V also wrote to Bishop Leo. Kehr, p. 256 no. 3 and 5.
  11. ^ Pope Calixtus II wrote to Pandulfus, asking him to influence Raonis to return property belonging to Monte Cassino. Kehr, p. 256 no. 8.
  12. ^ Pope Hadrian IV appointed two cardinals to settle a dispute in which Bishop Petrus was involved. Bishop Petrus was present at the Lateran Council of 1179. Petrus received a mandate from Pope Alexander III in 1180. Kehr, p. 257 no. 9 and 13.
  13. ^ Gams, p. 930. Pope Celestine III confirmed the boundaries of the diocese in a bull addressed to Bishop Theodinus on 29 September 1193. In 1197 Celestine III ordered the Archbishop of Naples to settle a dispute involving Bishop Peter; the settlement was ratified on 4 January 1197. Kehr, p. 258 no. 20; 259 no. 21.
  14. ^ Eubel, I, p. 480-481.
  15. ^ Eubel, I, pp. 481 and 418. It appears that Bishop Thomas followed the Avignon Obedience and was replaced by Urban VI of the Roman Obedience with Bishop Jordanus.
  16. ^ Eubel, II, p. 249.
  17. ^ In 1469 Fortiguerra resigned the abbacy of S. Basilio de Cavata in the diocese of Parma, and in 1477 the monastery of S. Bartolommeo in the diocese of Ferrara. Nicolaus Fortiguerra was named a cardinal by Pope Pius II in his first Consistory on 5 March 1460. He died on 21 December 1473. Eubel, II, p. 249.
  18. ^ Orsini had been Bishop of Tricarico from 1471 to 1474. Eubel, II, p. 255.
  19. ^ Borgia had been a Canon of Valencia. He was papal treasurer until 1508. He resigned the diocese. Eubel, II, p. 249; III, p. 311.
  20. ^ Eubel, III, p. 311
  21. ^ Squillante was a native of Naples, and had been a Canon of the Cathedral of Naples. Gauchat, IV, p. 331, with note 7. Cappelletti, p. 206.
  22. ^ Boldoni was born in Milan. Cappelletti, p. 207. Gauchat, IV, p. 331, with note 8.
  23. ^ Giberti was born in the village of San Ginesio in the diocese of Camerino. He was Doctor in utroque iure, Doctor of Civil and Canon Law (Macerata 1655). He was Vicar General of the diocese of Spoleto. He was consecrated in Rome on 18 May 1681 by Cardinal Giacomo Fransoni. Bishop Giberti resigned on 26 November 1697. Ritzler, V, p. 373, with note 3.
  24. ^ Pacifico was born in Aversa. He was Doctor in utroque iure, Doctor of Civil and Canon Law (Naples). He had been Vicar Capitular and Vicar General of the diocese of Aversa. He was consecrated in Rome on 2 February 1698 by Cardinal Bandino Panciatico. Ritzler, V, p. 373, with note 4.
  25. ^ Del Pozzo was Doctor in utroque iure, Doctor of Civil and Canon Law (Naples 1685). He was Canon of Salerno. Vicar-General of Calvi. He was consecrated in Rome on 27 February 1718 by Cardinal Giandomenico Paracciano. Ritzler, V, p. 373, with note 5.
  26. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 373, with note 6.
  27. ^ Longo was born in Benevento. He became Prior of the monastery of Sant'Angelo in Gaeta. He was consecrated in Rome on 13 March 1746 by Cardinal Joaquin Fernandez de Portocarrero. Ritzler, VI, p. 399, note 2.
  28. ^ Broya was Doctor in utroque iure, Doctor of Civil and Canon Law. He was a Protonotary Apostolic in the Roman Curia (1472). He was Vicar-General of the diocese of Capaccio. Ritzler, VI, p. 399, with note 4.
  29. ^ Onorati was Doctor in utroque iure, Doctor of Civil and Canon Law (Naples 1759). Ritzler, VI, p. 399, with note 5.
  30. ^ Pasca had been Abbot of S. Trinita de Cava. Michele Broccoli (1822). Teano Sidicino, antico, e moderno (in Italian). Parte III. Napoli: Presso P. Tizzano. pp. 198–200. 
  31. ^ Vecchi was a native of Camigliano. He was a Canon of the Church of Capua, and then Bishop of Conversano (1792-1797). Vecchi was the last bishop of Teano, due to a dispute between the Pope and the King of Naples. Michele Broccoli (1822). Teano Sidicino, antico, e moderno (in Italian). Parte III. Napoli: Presso P. Tizzano. pp. 200–201. 

Books[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]

Acknowledgment[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Teano". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

Coordinates: 41°15′00″N 14°04′00″E / 41.2500°N 14.0667°E / 41.2500; 14.0667