Black-billed sicklebill

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Black-billed sicklebill
DrepanornisAlbertisiSmit.jpg
Illustration of male (above) and female (below)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Paradisaeidae
Genus: Drepanornis
Species: D. albertisi
Binomial name
Drepanornis albertisi
(Sclater, 1873)
Synonyms

Epimachus albertisi

The black-billed sicklebill (Drepanornis albertiti), also known as buff-tailed sicklebill (leading to easy confusion with the hermit hummingbird Eutoxeres condamini), is a species of bird-of-paradise.

Conservation status[edit]

Widespread throughout its large range, the black-billed sicklebill is evaluated as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix II of CITES.

Etymology[edit]

The scientific name commemorates the Italian naturalist Luigi Maria d'Albertis, who discovered this species in 1872.

Subspecies[edit]

  • Drepanornis albertisi albertisi (Sclater, 1873)
  • Drepanornis albertisi cervinicauda Sclater, 1884
  • Drepanornis albertisi geisleri Meyer, 1893

[2]

Description[edit]

Drepanornis albertisi cervinicauda, museum specimen

The black-billed sicklebill is medium-sized, about 35 cm long, brown. The male has a bare maroon grey skin around its eye, buff colored tail, dark brown iris, yellow mouth and black sickle-like bill. It is adorned with dark horn-like forecrown feathers, an erectile fan-like bronze neck plumes and elongated purple-tipped flank plumes. Unadorned brown female is smaller with bill longer than male and dark barred below.

Biology[edit]

Its diet consists mainly of fruit and arthropods. The female lays one to two pale cream eggs with brown and grey spots.

Distribution[edit]

The black-billed sicklebill is distributed to mountain forests of New Guinea. It is not endangered

References[edit]

External links[edit]