Blue Mountain High School

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Blue Mountain High School
Map of Schuylkill County Pennsylvania School Districts.png
Address
1076 W Market Street
Schuylkill Haven, Pennsylvania, Schuylkill County 17972-9801
United States
Information
Type Public
School board 9 locally elected members
School district Blue Mountain School District
Superintendent

Dr. David H Helsel, salary $146,500 (2016)[1] (Contract January 12, 2016 - June 30, 2020)

former superintendent Dr. Robert Urzillo, salary $132,500 (2012), $136,475 (2013)[2]
School number (570) 366-0511
Administrator

Mrs Angel A Green, Business Manager
Musitano, Frank, salary $117,300
Witmer-Belding, Gwendolyn, salary $95,962
Rossi, Kenneth, salary $87,472

Ritschel, Jeffry, salary $87,270
Principal

Mr Kevin Berger, HS

Mr Kenneth S Rossi, HSVP
Faculty 70 teachers 2011
Grades 9th-12th
Age 14 years old to 21 years old special education
Pupils

795 pupils (2015-16)[3]
864 pupils (2013-14)[4]
913 pupils (2012-13)[5]

978 pupils (2010-11)[6]
 • Grade 9 236 (2014), 247 (2010)
 • Grade 10 165 (2014), 257
 • Grade 11 190 (2014), 230
 • Grade 12 206 (2014), 233 (2010)
 • Other Enrollment projected to be 898 in 2018[7]
Language English
Website

Blue Mountain High School is a small, rural public high school located at 1076 W Market Street, Schuylkill Haven, Pennsylvania in Schuylkill County. It was built in 1957 and renovated from 1999 to 2001. It is part of the Blue Mountain School District. By 2015, enrollment was reported as 795 pupils in 9th through 12th grades, with 22% of pupils eligible for a free lunch due to the family meeting the federal poverty level. Additionally, 20.7% of pupils received special education services, while 5.9% of pupils were identified as gifted.[8] The school employed 58 teachers.[9] Per the PA Department of Education, 100% of the teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act.[10]

In 2013, enrollment at the school had declined to 913 pupils, with 22.5% coming from low income homes.[11] According to the National Center for Education Statistics, in 2010, the High School reported an enrollment of 978 pupils in grades 9th through 12th, with 164 pupils eligible for a federal free or reduced price lunch due to the family meeting the federal poverty level. The school employed 70 teachers yielding a student teacher ratio of 13:1.[12] According to a report by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 100% of its teachers were rated "Highly Qualified" under No Child Left Behind Act.[13]

An original Wanamaker Eagle was donated to the school when the department store it had decorated for many years went out of business. The bronze Eagle stands in front of the school. The current principal of the school is Mr. Berger, and the assistant principal is Mr. Rossi.[14]

High school students may choose to attend the Schuylkill Technology Center for training in the construction and mechanical trades. The Schuylkill Intermediate Unit IU29 provides the school with a wide variety of services like: specialized education for disabled students; state mandated training on recognizing and reporting child abuse; speech and visual disability services; criminal background check processing for prospective employees and professional development for staff and faculty. In 2016-17, Blue Mountain School District began to offer a virtual academy for its pupils.

Blue Mountain Elementary, Middle and High School have been assigned a dress code this year.[15] According to the Blue Mountain School District's webpage, bmsd.org, the dress code policies include: pants must be a solid color of casual, dress, or corduroy style; pants must be fitted, but not too tight or too loose; capri pants are permitted; shorts and skorts are permitted, between April 15 and October 15, and must be worn within two inches of the knee; shirts must fit the students appropriately and be a solid color; shirts must have a collar; sweaters, turtle necks and crew neck sweatshirts are permitted, but must be worn with a dress policy appropriate shirt.

Graduation rate[edit]

In 2015, Blue Mountain School District’s graduation rate was 90.17%.[16]

  • 2014 - 90.68%
  • 2013 - 90%.[17]
  • 2012 - 94%.[18]
  • 2011 - 90%.[19]
  • 2010 - 90%, the Pennsylvania Department of Education issued a new, 4-year cohort graduation rate.[20]
According to traditional graduation rate calculations

Academics[edit]

2015 School Performance Profile

Blue Mountain High School achieved 82.1 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement. The PDE reported that 84% of the High School’s students were on grade level in reading/literature. In Algebra 1, 77% of students showed on grade level skills at the end of the course. In Biology I, just 64% demonstrated on grade level science understanding at the end of the course.[26] Statewide, 53 percent of schools with an eleventh grade achieved an academic score of 70 or better. Five percent of the 2,033 schools with 11th grade were scored at 90 and above; 20 percent were scored between 80 and 89; 28 percent between 70 and 79; 25 percent between 60 and 69 and 22 percent below 60. The Keystone Exam results showed: 73 percent of students statewide scored at grade-level in English, 64 percent in Algebra I and 59 percent in biology.[27][28]

2014 School Performance Profile

Blue Mountain High School achieved 86.8 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement. In reading/literature, 88.48% of pupils were on grade level. In Algebra 1, 81% showed on grade level skills. In Biology, just 65% demonstrated on grade level science understanding at the end of the course.[29][30] Statewide, the percentage of high school students who scored proficient and advanced in Algebra I increased to 39.7% to 40.1%. The percentage of high school students who scored proficient and advanced in reading/literature declined to 52.5%. The percentage of high school students who scored proficient and advanced in biology improved from 39.7% to 41.4%.[31]

2013 School Performance Profile

Blue Mountain High School achieved 82.1 out of 100. Reflects on grade level reading, mathematics and science achievement. In reading/literature -84% were on grade level. In Algebra 1, 72% showed on grade level skills. In Biology, 37.8% showed on grade level science understanding.[32] According to the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2,181 public schools (less than 73 percent of Pennsylvania public schools), achieved an academic score of 70 or higher.

AYP history[edit]

In 2012, Blue Mountain High School achieved AYP status. In 2011, Blue Mountain High School declined to Warning AYP status, due to lagging student achievement.[33]

PSSA Results

Pennsylvania System of School Assessments, commonly called PSSAs are No Child Left Behind Act related examinations which were administered from 2003 through 2012, in all Pennsylvania public high schools. The exams were administered in the Spring of each school year. The goal was for 100% of students to be on grade level or better in reading and mathematics, by the Spring of 2014. The tests focused on the state's Academic Standards for reading, writing, mathematics and science. The Science exam included content in science, technology, ecology and the environmental studies. The mathematics exam included: algebra I, algebra II, geometry and trigonometry. The standards were first published in 1998 and are mandated by the Pennsylvania State Board of Education.[34]

In 2013, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania changed its high school assessments to the Keystone Exams in Algebra 1, Reading/literature and Biology1. The exams are given at the end of the applicable course, rather than all in the spring of the student's 11th grade year.[35] The state announced the change in 2010 and made it in order to comply with Governor Edward G. Rendell's agreement to change to the national Common Core standards.[36]

11th Grade Reading
  • 2012 - 81% on grade level (7% below basic). State - 67% of 11th graders are on grade level.[37]
  • 2011 - 72% (15% below basic). State - 69.1%[38]
  • 2010 - 76%, State - 67%[39]
  • 2009 – 74%, State - 65%[40]
  • 2008 – 68%, State – 65%[41]
  • 2007 – 74%, State – 65%[42]
  • 2006 – 76%, State – 65%[43]

2005 – 75%, State – 65%

11th Grade Math
  • 2012 - 67% on grade level (15% below basic). In Pennsylvania, 59% of 11th graders are on grade level.[44]
  • 2011 - 59% (24% below basic). State - 60.3%[45]
  • 2010 - 64%, State - 59%
  • 2009 – 55%, State – 56%[46]
  • 2008 – 57%, State – 55%[47]
  • 2007 – 61%, State – 53%
  • 2006 – 56%, State – 52%
  • 2005 – 64%, State – 51%
11th Grade Science
  • 2012 - 64% on grade level (5% below basic). State - 42% of 11th graders were on grade level.[48]
  • 2011 - 49% (14% below basic). State - 40%[49]
  • 2010 - 46%, State - 39%
  • 2009 – 50%, State – 40%
  • 2008 – 48%, State – 39%[50]

Science in Motion Blue Mountain High School took advantage of a state program called Science in Motion which brought college professors and sophisticated science equipment to the school to raise science awareness and to provide inquiry-based experiences for the students. The Science in Motion program was funded by a state appropriation and cost the school nothing to participate.[51] Wilkes University provides the experiences to schools in the region.

College remediation[edit]

According to a Pennsylvania Department of Education study released in January 2009, 22% of Blue Mountain High School graduates required remediation in mathematics and or reading before they were prepared to take college level courses in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education or community colleges.[52] Less than 66% of Pennsylvania high school graduates, who enroll in a four-year college in Pennsylvania, will earn a bachelor's degree within six years. Among Pennsylvania high school graduates pursuing an associate degree, only one in three graduate in three years.[53] Per the Pennsylvania Department of Education, one in three recent high school graduates who attend Pennsylvania's public universities and community colleges takes at least one remedial course in math, reading or English.

Dual enrollment[edit]

Blue Mountain High School offers a Dual Enrollment program. This state program permits high school students to take courses, at local higher education institutions, to earn college credits. Students remain enrolled at their high school. The courses count towards high school graduation requirements and towards earning a college degree. The students continue to have full access to activities and programs at their high school, including the graduation ceremony. The college credits are offered at a deeply discounted rate. The state offers a small grant to assist students in costs for tuition, fees and books.[54] Under the Pennsylvania Transfer and Articulation Agreement, many Pennsylvania colleges and universities accept these credits for students who transfer to their institutions.[55]

For the 2009–10 funding year, the school district received a state grant of $25,373 for the program.[56] In 2010, Governor Edward Rendell eliminated the grants to students, from the Commonwealth, due to a state budget crisis.

Graduation requirements[edit]

Among Pennsylvania's 500 public school districts, graduation requirements widely vary. The Blue Mountain School Board has determined that a pupil must earn 22 credits for the Class of 2015 (and beyond) to graduate including: math 3 credits, English 4 credits, social studies 4 credits, science 3 credits, Physical Education 2 credits, Arts and Humanities 1.5 credits and electives 3.5 credits.[57]

By law, all Pennsylvania secondary school students must complete a project as a part of their eligibility to graduate from high school. The type of project, its rigor and its expectations are set by the individual school district.[58] At Blue Mountain High School, the project requires a typed research paper that crosses at least three different standards areas, and be a minimum of ten pages.[59] Effective with the graduating class of 2017, the Pennsylvania State Board of Education eliminated the state mandate that students complete a culminating project in order to graduate.[60]

By Pennsylvania School Board regulations, beginning with the class of 2019,[61] public school students must demonstrate successful completion of secondary level course work in Algebra I, Biology, and English Literature by passing the Keystone Exams.[62] The exam is given at the end of the course. Keystone Exams replace the PSSAs for 11th grade. Students have several opportunities to pass the Keystone exam, with those who do not able to perform a project in order to graduate.[63][64] For the class of 2019, a Composition exam will be added. For the class of 2020, passing a civics and government exam will be added to the graduation requirements.[65] In 2011, Pennsylvania high school students field tested the Algebra 1, Biology and English Lit exams. The statewide results were: Algebra 1 38% on grade level, Biology 35% on grade level and English Lit - 49% on grade level.[66] Individual student, school or district reports were not made public, although they were reported to district officials by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. Students identified as having special needs and qualifying for an Individual Educational Program (IEP) may graduate by meeting the requirements of their IEP.

SAT Scores[edit]

In 2014, 154 Blue Mountain School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 504. The Math average score was 511. The Writing average score was 491.[67][68] Statewide in Pennsylvania, Verbal Average Score was 497. The Math average score was 504. The Writing average score was 480. The College Board also reported that nationwide scores were: 497 in reading, 513 in math and 487 in writing.[69] In 2014, 1,672,395 students took the SATs in the United States.

In 2013, Blue Mountain School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 510. The Math average score was 513. The Writing average score was 496. The College Board reported that statewide scores were: 494 in reading, 504 in math and 482 in writing. The nationwide SAT results were the same as in 2012.[70]

In 2012, 156 Blue Mountain School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 507. The Math average score was 516. The Writing average score was 497. The statewide Verbal SAT exams results were: Verbal 491, Math 501, Writing 480. In the USA, 1.65 million students took the exams achieving scores: Verbal 496, Math 514, Writing 488. According to the College Board the maximum score on each section was 800, and 360 students nationwide scored a perfect 2,400.

In 2011, 165 Blue Mountain School District students took the SAT exams. The District's Verbal Average Score was 500. The Math average score was 506. The Writing average score was 474.[71] Pennsylvania ranked 40th among states with SAT scores: Verbal - 493, Math - 501, Writing - 479.[72] In the United States, 1.65 million students took the exam in 2011. They averaged 497 (out of 800) verbal, 514 math and 489 in writing.[73]

In 2006, Blue Mountain students had an average SAT score of 1070; average 527 in the verbal section and 543 in the math.

AP Courses[edit]

In 2013, Blue Mountain High School offered 9 Advanced Placement (AP) courses at a higher cost than regular courses. Students have the option of taking College Board approved courses and then taking the College Board's examination in the Spring. Students, who achieve a 3 or better on the exam, may be awarded college credits at US universities and colleges. Each higher education institution sets its own standards about what level of credits are awarded to a student based on their AP exam score. Most higher education give credits for scores of 4 or 5. Some schools also give credits for scores of 3. High schools give credits towards graduation to students who take the school's AP class. At Blue Mountain High School 17% of students who took an AP course at the school earned a 3 or better on the exam.[74]

In 2015, Blue Mountain reported offering 19 AP courses, with just 29% of pupils earning a 3 or better on the AP exam given by the College Board.[75]

Tuition[edit]

Students who live in the Blue Mountain School District's attendance area may choose to attend one of Pennsylvania's 157 public charter schools. A student living in a neighboring public school district or a foreign exchange student may seek admission to Blue Mountain School District. For these cases, the Pennsylvania Department of Education sets an annual tuition rate for each school district. It is the amount the public school district pays to a charter school for each resident student that attends the charter and it is the amount a nonresident student's parents must pay to attend the Blue Mountain School District's schools. The 2012 tuition rates are Elementary School - $8,263.33, High School - $8,508.62.[76]

Classrooms for the Future grant[edit]

The Classroom for the Future state program provided districts with hundreds of thousands of extra state funding to buy laptop computers for each core curriculum high school class (English, Science, History, Math) and paid for teacher training to optimize the computers use. The program was funded from 2006-2009. Blue Mountain High School did not apply for funding in 2006-07 nor 2007-08. For the 2008-09, school year the High School received $148,630 in state funding.[77] Among the public school districts in Schuylkill County, the highest award was given to North Schuylkill School District which received $245,673. The highest funding statewide was awarded to Philadelphia City School District in Philadelphia County - $9,409,073. The grant program was discontinued by Governor Edward Rendell as part of the 2009-10 state budget. Of the 501 public school districts in Pennsylvania, 447 of them received Classrooms for the Future grant awards, while 50 never applied for funding.

Other grants[edit]

Blue Mountain High School did not apply for: 2012 and 2013 Pennsylvania Hybrid Learning Grants;[78] nor the Project 720 High School Reform grants[79] (discontinued effective with 2011-12 budget).

Wellness policy[edit]

Blue Mountain School Board established a district wellness policy in 2006 - Policy 246.[80] The policy deals with nutritious meals served at school, the control of access to some foods and beverages during school hours, age appropriate nutrition education for all students, and physical education for students K-12. According to the policy, the Superintendent shall annually report to the Board on the district’s compliance with law and policies related to student wellness. The policy is in response to state mandates and federal legislation (P.L. 108 - 265). The law dictates that each school district participating in a program authorized by the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq) or the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 U.S.C. 1771 et seq) "shall establish a local school wellness policy by School Year 2006."

The legislation placed the responsibility of developing a wellness policy at the local level so the individual needs of each district can be addressed. According to the requirements for the Local Wellness Policy, school districts must set goals for nutrition education, physical activity, campus food provision, and other school-based activities designed to promote student wellness. Additionally, districts were required to involve a broad group of individuals in policy development and to have a plan for measuring policy implementation. Districts were offered a choice of levels of implementation for limiting or prohibiting low nutrition foods on the school campus. In final implementation these regulations prohibit some foods and beverages on the school campus.[81] The Pennsylvania Department of Education required the district to submit a copy of the policy for approval.

Blue Mountain High School offers both a free school breakfast and free or reduced-price lunch to children in low income families. All students attending the school can eat breakfast and lunch. Children from families with incomes at or below 130 percent of the federal poverty level are provided a breakfast and lunch at no cost to the family. Children from families with incomes between 130 and 185 percent of the federal poverty level can be charged no more than 30 cents per breakfast. A foster child whose care and placement is the responsibility of the State or who is placed by a court with a caretaker household is eligible for both a free breakfast and a free lunch. Runaway, homeless and Migrant Youth are also automatically eligible for free meals.[82] The meals are partially funded with federal dollars through the United States Department of Agriculture.[83]

In 2013, the USDA issued new restrictions to foods in public schools. The rules apply to foods and beverages sold on all public school district campuses during the day. They limit vending machine snacks to a maximum of 200 calories per item. Additionally, all snack foods sold at school must meet competitive nutrient standards, meaning they must have fruits, vegetables, dairy or protein in them or contain at least 10 percent of the daily value of fiber, calcium, potassium, and Vitamin D.[84] In order to comply with the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 all US public school districts are required to raise the price of their school lunches to $2.60 regardless of the actual cost of providing the lunch.[85] The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 mandates that Districts raise their full pay lunch prices every year until the price of non-subsidized lunches equals the amount the federal government reimburses schools for free meals. That subsidy in 2013-2014 was $2.93. In 2015, federal reimbursement rates were: $3.07 per meal for students who are income-eligible for free lunches and $2.67 for those who qualify for a reduced price. School lunch participation nationally dropped from 31.6 million students in 2012 to 30.4 million in 2014, according to the federal Department of Agriculture. Pennsylvania statistics show school lunch participation dropped by 86,950 students in the same two years, from 1,127,444 in 2012 to 1,040,494 in 2014.[86]

In 2014, President Barack Obama ordered a prohibition of advertisements for unhealthy foods on public school campuses during the school day.[87][88] The US Department of Agriculture requires that students take milk as their beverage at lunch. In accordance with this law, any student requesting water in place of milk with their lunch must present a written request, signed by a doctor, documenting the need for water instead of milk.[89][90]

Blue Mountain High School provides health services as mandated by the Commonwealth and the federal government. A nurse is available in the building to conduct annual health screenings (data reported to the PDE and state Department of Health) and to dispense prescribed medications to students during the school day. Students can be excluded from school unless they comply with all the State Department of Health’s extensive immunization mandates. School nurses monitor each pupil for this compliance.[91][92] Nurses also monitor each child's weight.[93]

In 2016, the Pennsylvania Department of Health distributed to each Pennsylvania high school the overdose antidote drug naloxone in a nasal spray. School nurses were also provided with educational materials and training developed by the National Association of School Nurses.[94] The cost was covered by a grant from a private foundation.[95]

The District participated in Highmark Healthy High 5 Health eTools for Schools which enabled mobile data collection of health and physical fitness screening data on students K-12 in a database held by InnerLink, Inc. in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Health eTools for Schools also provided interdisciplinary research-based curriculum in nutrition, physical education and physical activity to participating districts. The program was discontinued in 2013.[96]

Extracurriculars[edit]

Blue Mountain School District offers a variety of clubs, activities and an extensive, costly sports program.[97] Eligibility for participation is determined by school board policy and in compliance with standards set by the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA). The PIAA mandates that student athletes must be passing at least four full-credit subjects to participate in sports.[98] In 2012, the Obama Administration's US Department of Education issued a directive that schools include students with disabilities in extracurricular activities including sports.[99]

By Pennsylvania law, all K-12 students who reside within the district, including those who attend a private nonpublic school, cyber charter school, charter school and those homeschooled, are all eligible to participate in the extracurricular programs including all athletics provided by Blue Mountain. The students must meet the same eligibility rules as the students enrolled in the district's schools.[100]

According to PA Child Abuse Recognition and Reporting Act 126 of 2014, all volunteer coaches and all those who assist in student activities, must have criminal background checks. Like all school district employees, they must also attend an anti child abuse training once every three years.[101][102][103]

Athletics Department[edit]

Blue Mountain, led by Co-Athletic Directors Harry Myers and Ruth Weidman, offers a variety of District XI sports. Doug Morgan and Jim Ebling are assistant athletic directors for the fall season, Burt Werdt and Jim Ebling are assistant athletic directors for the winter season, and Bob Hepler and Tom Bonner are assistant athletic directors for the spring season. Blue Mountain consists of football, boys' and girls' cross country, golf, girls' tennis, and girls' volleyball in the fall, boys' and girls' basketball, wrestling, and swimming and diving in the winter, and baseball, softball, track and field, girls' soccer and boys' tennis in the spring. In most sports, it is a AAA school, although swimming and soccer are AA. Coaches receive compensation as outlined in the teachers' union contract. When athletic competition exceeds the regular season, additional compensation is paid.[104]

According to Pennsylvania’s Safety in Youth Sports Act, all sports coaches, paid and volunteer, are required to annually complete the Concussion Management Certification Training and present the certification before coaching.[105][106]

Cross country[edit]

The Cross Country team started in 1968 as a club under the direction of Mr. Ralph Jeager, who would coach until 1987. Mr. Jordan Sullivan and Mr. Ed Taylor coached for several years each. In 1999, Mr. Cory Cantwell became head coach, assisted by Tyler Maley. From 1971 to 1984, the team met phenomenal success, winning League titles each year and District titles in twelve of the fourteen years. From 2001 to 2007 the cross country team has met phenomenal success because of coach Jared Buckman who took over the team. The girls' cross country team won leagues three years in a row from 2005 to 2007 while placing third in the 2004 season. The boys' team also succeeded by finishing in the top teams in the league meets for the past couple years.

Boys' Soccer[edit]

The Blue Mountain boys' soccer team was one of the first schools in the county to embrace soccer as a varsity sport thanks to the efforts of ex-Blue Mountain chemistry teacher and current head coach Rob Burcik. The team has won multiple league championships since its founding, most recently by 2011's varsity squad. Coach Burcik is assisted by coaches Joshua Ott and Bill Dukman.

Football[edit]

The Blue Mountain Football team was started in 1957 when the school was completed. The team's main rivals are Schuylkill Haven High School and Pottsville Area High School. They have a new head coach Cory Mabry and assistants John Sanders, John Carestia, Matt Harrison, Tony Sanders,

Golf[edit]

The Blue Mountain golf team won the Schuylkill League ten straight years, from 1999 through 2008. The coach is Larry Bordan, who is the golf professional at Schuylkill County Country Club. It is one of the school's best teams. Larry Bordan went to Sch. haven in the 1970s and before he was the coach, back in the 1970s was Mr. Patton.

Girls' Softball[edit]

The Blue Mountain Varsity softball team won the Schuylkill League Championship in 2006, and advanced to the semi-finals in districts last year. They finished with a winning record.

Boys' and Girls' Swim Team[edit]

The Blue Mountain Girls' Varsity Swim Team won the District XI AA Title in 2007 for the second year in a row. The Girls' team also won the Schuylkill League Championships in 2007, 2013, and 2015. The boys' team has won the Schuylkill League Title in 2013 and 2014. Both teams have sent swimmers to the PIAA state meet.

Boys' Basketball[edit]

The Blue Mountain Boys' Basketball team won the District XI Championship in 1996 and the Schuylkill League Championship in 2007 and played in the State Playoffs 3 straight years. The team's head coach is Mr. Dustin Werdt who has coached at Blue Mountain for only a few years.

Girls' Basketball[edit]

Blue Mountain's girls' basketball team has had a very winning record and made it to the league playoffs and districts many times and were very successful there.

Wrestling[edit]

The Blue Mountain wrestling team is one of the school's sports teams. Placing top four in the 07-08 district 11 duals and qualifying for the past two years is a Blue Mt. first ever. They qualified 7 wrestlers to the Norhteast regional finals last season in 07-08 which is a new school record and had two state finalists last season one taking first and one taking second. The 08–09 season was even better as the team placed 6th at the Iron Man(toughest tournament in nation), and qualified for the state duals for the first time ever but fell in the state semis. They then had 8 qualify for northeast regionals. The team then qualified six wrestlers for states. The eagles had 5 state place winners then and were the state runner up giving blue mountain its first ever state trophy. The eagles have nine 100 wins. They are coached by Head Coach Todd Kindig and assistant coach Harry Myers, and Gary Keener.

Girls' Volleyball

The Blue Mountain girls' volleyball team is a growing sport at the school. In 2008, the team won the Division I league and played in the league semi-finals. In 2009, the team was Schuylkill League runner ups, losing in the finals to Nativity. Currently, Blue Mountain is coached by head coach, Nick Marrongelle and assistant coach, Kyle Rice.

Baseball[edit]

Blue Mountain's Baseball team is the most successful sports team in this history of the school. Having one losing season in program history, they have won District titles in 2008, 2009, 2011 and 2012. They have also had second-place finishes in 2007, 2014 and 2015. The team is coached by Thomas Kramer and Bill Dobrolsky.

Varsity Club[edit]

The BMHS Varsity Club is a club for athletes with at least one varsity letter. It is dedicated to fulfilling service projects to the school and community.

Clubs[edit]

Art Club[edit]

Led by Mr. Whalen and Mr.Pasierb, this club is for people to make and enjoy art. The art club has several yearly contests such as the ornament contest and the Jambandoree poster contest. The art club is also responsible for hosting the yearly Jambandoree and Art Show. Profits from the Jambandoree benefit the art club.

Anime Club[edit]

Hosted by the chemistry teacher Mr. Bill Swan, the anime club is a club for teaching people the superior art of Japanese animation. It also teaches the Japanese language if anyone is interested. Formed by Blue Mountain Graduate Kelsey Shappell

Improv Club[edit]

A new addition to Blue Mountain High School, the Improv Club meets bi-weekly. Moderated by 1998 graduate Paul Weller, III, the Improv Club's goal is to show students that acting can be both fun and educational.

Yearbook[edit]

Every 9th period the yearbook staff gathers to work on forming the Blue Mountain Eagle Echo. This club is run by Mrs.Clemas and Mrs. Batory. The yearbook staff takes pictures, forms layouts, hosts club and activity picture day, and distributes the yearbooks to the school.

Newspaper[edit]

The BMHS newspaper is called the Aerie and carries information on school and world events.

Band[edit]

The band program at BMHS is led by Mr. Chris Evans. Band offers budding and experienced musicians a variety of ensemble choices.

Marching band[edit]

The Marching Band performs at football games and competes in various events throughout the season. The Marching Band has an auxiliary unit called the Guard, which is a flag corps. The marching band has competed in several major events. These include Tournament of Bands Championships at Lackawanna County Stadium, Cadets Marching Band Cooperative (now USBands) at Giants/Jets Stadium, Cavalcade of Bands, Walt Disney World Parade, Azalea Festival Parade in Richmond, Virginia, etc.

Symphonic Band[edit]

The Symphonic Band performs at spring concerts, adjudications, and school and community events throughout the spring semester. This ensemble studies and plays pieces spanning five centuries of musical genres.

Jazz Band[edit]

The Jazz Ensemble performs concerts each year. This ensemble features extra instrumentation in the rhythm section and allows selected band members to experience the jazz genre of music.

Indoor Drumline[edit]

In December of each year, the Indoor Drumline begins its intensive rehearsals for its competition season, during which it performs in weekly competitions beginning in March. The ensemble consists of snare drums, a series of pitched bass drums, quints, cymbals, and various pit instruments, including marimba, xylophone, vibraphone, timpani and other auxiliary instruments.

They won, in 2006, the Scholastic Novice championship in Wildwood, NJ.

Indoor Color Guard[edit]

As an extension of the outdoor marching band color guard the indoor guard was formed in the fall of 2001 to better serve the needs of the program year round. The color guard performs several times throughout the winter and spring months ending with championships in either late April or early May. The group can consist of as many as 30 members or as few as 5. Normally BMHS guard averages around 9–12 members. Each year the staff selects some sort of recorded music to which the color guard will perform. Equipment consists of flags, rifles, and sabers. The guard normally incorporates dance into the shows to add a layer of difficulty and design.

2008 the guard won the Chapter Championships and a week later qualified for the All-Chapter Championships and finished 8th.

Notable alumni[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ AMY MARCHIANO (November 21, 2015). "Blue Mountain chooses new superintendent". Republican Herald. 
  2. ^ Tribune Live.com (2015). "PA Teacher Salaries Database". 
  3. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (December 4, 2015). "Blue Mountain High School Fast Facts 2015". 
  4. ^ PDE, Enrollment by LEA and School 2013-14, 2014
  5. ^ PDE, Enrollment by LEA and School 2012-13, 2013
  6. ^ National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data - Blue Mountain High School, 2012
  7. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (July 2011). "Enrollment and Projections by school district". 
  8. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (November 4, 2015). "Blue Mountain High School Fast Facts 2015". 
  9. ^ US News and World Report, Best High Schools, 2015
  10. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (2015). "Highly Qualified Teacher Guidelines". 
  11. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, School Performance Fast Facts - Blue Mountain High School, 2013
  12. ^ National Center for Education Statistics, Common Care Data - Blue Mountain High School, 2010
  13. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Professional Qualifications of Teachers Blue Mountain High School 2012, September 21, 2012
  14. ^ General Info: Faculty and Staff Listing, www.bmsd.org/HighSchool/
  15. ^ Dress and Grooming Policies, www.bmsd.org
  16. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (December 4, 2015). "Blue Mountain High School Fast Facts". 
  17. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (December 5, 2013). "Blue Mountain High School Fast Facts". 
  18. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (September 21, 2012). "Blue Mountain School District AYP Data Table 2012". 
  19. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Blue Mountain School District AYP Data Table 2011, September 29, 2011
  20. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (March 15, 2011). "New 4-year Cohort Graduation Rate Calculation Now Being Implemented". 
  21. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education (January 2011). "Blue Mountain School District Academic Achievement Report Card 2010" (PDF). 
  22. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Blue Mountain School District Academic Achievement Report Card 2009
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  27. ^ Jan Murphy (November 4, 2015). "Report card for state's high schools show overall decline". Pennlive.com. 
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  30. ^ Evamarie Socha (November 6, 2014). "Half of Valley districts see state test scores decline". The Daily Item. 
  31. ^ Eleanor Chute (November 21, 2014). "Pennsylvania student scores declined with reduced funding, test results show". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 
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  36. ^ Steve Esack, (May 14, 2013). "Pennsylvania getting swept into national 'Common Core' education debate". MCALL news. 
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  50. ^ Pennsylvania Department of Education, Report on PSSA Science 2008 results by school and grade
  51. ^ The Pennsylvania Basic Education/Higher Education Science and Technology Partnership, Science in Motion annual report, 2012
  52. ^ Pennsylvania College Remediation Report http://www.scribd.com/doc/23970364/Pennsylvania-College-Remediation-Report
  53. ^ National Center for Education Statistics
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  57. ^ Blue Mountain School District Administration, Blue Mountain High School Curriculum Guide, 2013-14
  58. ^ "Pennsylvania Code §4.24 (a) High school graduation requirements". 
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  80. ^ Blue Mountain School Board Policy Manual
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  87. ^ Denver Nicks (February 25, 2014). "White House Sets New Limits on Junk Food Ads in Schools". Time Magazine. 
  88. ^ Mary Clare Jalonick (February 25, 2014). "New rules limit junk food advertising in schools". Associated Press. 
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  95. ^ Ben Allen (February 2, 2016). "Pa. to put drug that reverses overdoses in schools for free". WITF. 
  96. ^ Cathy Hoffman, Interlink (September 2, 2008). "Highmark Foundation Extends Subsidy for Health eTools for Schools through 2013" (PDF). 
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  98. ^ Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (2015). "KNOW YOUR ELIGIBILITY RULES". 
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  106. ^ UMPC Sports Medicine (2014). "Managing Concussions in Student Athletes: The Safety in Youth Sports Act". 

References[edit]

External links[edit]