Bourjois

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Bourjois
Public
Industry Beauty
Founded 1863 in Paris, France
Headquarters Puteaux, France
Products Fragrance
Cosmetics
Skin care
Owner Coty, Inc.
Website www.bourjois.fr

Bourjois is a French cosmetics company currently owned by the American group Coty Inc. Bourjois creates make-up, fragrance and skincare products, which are sold in approximately 23 000 points of sales in more than 50 countries worldwide, as of 2015.[1] The brand was born in 1862 into the world of Paris' scene of theater and performing arts with the creation of the round-shaped face powder by Joseph-Albert Ponsin. More than 150 years later, Bourjois continues to innovate and create tasteful and accessible products in order to allow the modern women express her inner style and personality.[2]

History[edit]

  • 1862: Actor Joseph-Albert Ponsin created a skin product that would whiten the skin of artists, actors and actresses from theater and boulevard companies, to replace the greasy stage makeup in use by theatre artists.[3]
  • 1863: Ponsin launched his makeup company by preparing make up and perfume for actors and actresses.[4]
  • 1868: Alexandre-Napoleon Bourjois, a partner in the company was entrusted with Ponsin's entire activity.[5]
  • 1879: Word spread beyond theatre about their products and with the creation of a Java Rice Powder, a product to lighten the skin and leave it velvety, their target market widened to women and extended to the mass market worldwide.
  • 1917: Pierre Wertheimer and his brother Paul took over the directorship of the company. The Wertheimer family, holders of the Chanel group, would own Bourjours for nearly 100 years.
  • 1924: The first perfume of Bourjois, Mon Parfum, was designed by Ernest Beaux, the perfumer most famous for creating Chanel No. 5.[6]
  • 1928: Bourjois created its most iconic perfume, Soir de Paris. The blue bottled perfume was a great success in the United States, where it was called Evening in Paris. It was one of the most popular fragrances during World War II is highly valued by collectors nowadays.[7]
  • 1936: As women had started their fight of independence; Bourjois adapted to suit their market by promoting the use of make up for personal pleasure and to affirm personality. The company supported women's right to vote by one of its campaigns while the idea was still justa discussion in the French parliament.[8]
  • 1938: Constantin Weriguine was hired as a perfumer at Bourjois. He would go on to create fragrances such as Mais Oui (1938), Ramage (1951) and Glamour (1953) for the company.
  • 1960: By this time Bourjois had developed a variety of perfumes, gift boxes, kits and make up products.
  • 2014: In April 2015, the American group Coty Inc. bought Bourjois from the brothers Wertheimer for approximately 239 million American dollars.[9]

References[edit]

External links[edit]