British Journal of Sports Medicine

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British Journal of Sports Medicine
50.14 Consensus and Belfast.jpg
DisciplineSports medicine
LanguageEnglish
Edited byJonathan Drezner
Publication details
History1966-present
Publisher
FrequencySemi-monthly
Hybrid
18.473 (2021)
Standard abbreviations
ISO 4Br. J. Sports Med.
Indexing
CODENBJSMDZ
ISSN0306-3674 (print)
1473-0480 (web)
OCLC no.890384547
Links

The British Journal of Sports Medicine is a twice-monthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering sports science and sports medicine including sport physiotherapy. It is published by the BMJ Group. It was established in 1964 and the editor-in-chief from 2008 to 2020 was Karim M. Khan (University of British Columbia). Jonathan Drezner (University of Washington) has been editor-in-chief since January 1, 2021.[1]

Abstracting and indexing[edit]

According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2021 impact factor of 18.473.[2]

International Olympic Committee consensus statements[edit]

Since 2009, the journal has partnered with the International Olympic Committee to produce regular consensus statements regarding important issues in sports injury prevention and elite sport. Some of the recent examples include Consensus Statements on concussions in sport (the "Berlin guidelines"),[3] relative energy deficiency in sport,[4] the relationship between training load and injury,[5] mental health issues in athletes,[6] and methods for injury and illness surveillance.[7] These statements can assist in guiding clinicians.[8]

Controversies[edit]

In October 2018, over 170 academics signed a letter to the journal complaining after it ran an opinion piece by Aseem Malhotra. The group argued that the article made the "misleading and wrong" statement that saturated fat did not cause heart disease.[9] Fiona Godlee, editor-in-chief of The BMJ, defended the journal's right to challenge "the status quo in some settings".[9]

The IOC consensus statements are also not without controversy, with some writers accusing them[clarification needed] of excessive conflict of interest.[10] Another conflict of interest was raised by Pielke et al. about the accuracy of a study published in the journal later used in the drafting of IAAF regulations on permitted testosterone levels for female athletes.[11]

A former editor, Paul McCrory, was found to have plagiarised one of more articles he wrote in the journal around 2005, forcing one retraction and public criticism of the governance of the journal during this period.[12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New Editor-in-Chief for British Journal of Sports Medicine | BMJ". BMJ. Retrieved 15 October 2020.
  2. ^ "British Journal of Sports Medicine". 2021 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science (Science ed.). Clarivate. 2022.
  3. ^ McCrory, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem; Dvorak, Jiří; Aubry, Mark; Bailes, Julian; Broglio, Steven; Cantu, Robert C.; Cassidy, David; Echemendia, Ruben J.; Castellani, Rudy J.; Davis, Gavin A.; Ellenbogen, Richard; Emery, Carolyn; Engebretsen, Lars; Feddermann-Demont, Nina; Giza, Christopher C.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Herring, Stanley; Iverson, Grant L.; Johnston, Karen M.; Kissick, James; Kutcher, Jeffrey; Leddy, John J.; Maddocks, David; Makdissi, Michael; Manley, Geoff T.; McCrea, Michael; Meehan, William P.; Nagahiro, Sinji; Patricios, Jon; Putukian, Margot; Schneider, Kathryn J.; Sills, Allen; Tator, Charles H.; Turner, Michael; Vos, Pieter E. (1 June 2017). "Consensus statement on concussion in sport—the 5th international conference on concussion in sport held in Berlin, October 2016". British Journal of Sports Medicine. 51 (11): 838–847. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2017-097699.
  4. ^ Mountjoy, Margo; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn Kaiander; Burke, Louise M.; Ackerman, Kathryn E.; Blauwet, Cheri; Constantini, Naama; Lebrun, Constance; Lundy, Bronwen; Melin, Anna Katarina; Meyer, Nanna L.; Sherman, Roberta T.; Tenforde, Adam S.; Torstveit, Monica Klungland; Budgett, Richard (1 June 2018). "IOC consensus statement on relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S): 2018 update". British Journal of Sports Medicine. 52 (11): 687–697. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2018-099193.
  5. ^ Soligard, Torbjørn; Schwellnus, Martin; Alonso, Juan-Manuel; Bahr, Roald; Clarsen, Ben; Dijkstra, H. Paul; Gabbett, Tim; Gleeson, Michael; Hägglund, Martin; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Rensburg, Christa Janse van; Khan, Karim M.; Meeusen, Romain; Orchard, John W.; Pluim, Babette M.; Raftery, Martin; Budgett, Richard; Engebretsen, Lars (1 September 2016). "How much is too much? (Part 1) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury". British Journal of Sports Medicine. 50 (17): 1030–1041. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096581.
  6. ^ Reardon, Claudia L.; Hainline, Brian; Aron, Cindy Miller; Baron, David; Baum, Antonia L.; Bindra, Abhinav; Budgett, Richard; Campriani, Niccolo; Castaldelli-Maia, João Mauricio; Currie, Alan; Derevensky, Jeffrey Lee; Glick, Ira D.; Gorczynski, Paul; Gouttebarge, Vincent; Grandner, Michael A.; Han, Doug Hyun; McDuff, David; Mountjoy, Margo; Polat, Aslihan; Purcell, Rosemary; Putukian, Margot; Rice, Simon; Sills, Allen; Stull, Todd; Swartz, Leslie; Zhu, Li Jing; Engebretsen, Lars (1 June 2019). "Mental health in elite athletes: International Olympic Committee consensus statement (2019)". British Journal of Sports Medicine. 53 (11): 667–699. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2019-100715.
  7. ^ Bahr, Roald; Clarsen, Ben; Derman, Wayne; Dvorak, Jiri; Emery, Carolyn A.; Finch, Caroline F.; Hägglund, Martin; Junge, Astrid; Kemp, Simon; Khan, Karim M.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Meeuwisse, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Orchard, John W.; Pluim, Babette; Quarrie, Kenneth L.; Reider, Bruce; Schwellnus, Martin; Soligard, Torbjørn; Stokes, Keith A.; Timpka, Toomas; Verhagen, Evert; Bindra, Abhinav; Budgett, Richard; Engebretsen, Lars; Erdener, Uğur; Chamari, Karim (1 April 2020). "International Olympic Committee consensus statement: methods for recording and reporting of epidemiological data on injury and illness in sport 2020 (including STROBE Extension for Sport Injury and Illness Surveillance (STROBE-SIIS))". British Journal of Sports Medicine. 54 (7): 372–389. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2019-101969. PMC 7146946.
  8. ^ "The top 5 key messages from the 5th International Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport" (PDF). Canadian Concussion Collaborative.
  9. ^ a b Boseley S (30 October 2018). "Butter nonsense: the rise of the cholesterol deniers". The Guardian.
  10. ^ Partridge, Bradley; Hall, Wayne. "Sport concussion guidelines rife with conflicts of interest". The Conversation.
  11. ^ Pielke, Roger; Tucker, Ross; Boye, Erik (2019). "Scientific integrity and the IAAF testosterone regulations". The International Sports Law Journal. 19 (1–2): 18–26. doi:10.1007/s40318-019-00143-w.
  12. ^ Bull, Andy (9 March 2022). "How a plagiarism problem has started to shift rugby's concussion protocols | Andy Bull". the Guardian.
  13. ^ Bailey, Jonathan (3 March 2022). "When the Editor is the Plagiarist". Plagiarism Today. Retrieved 20 March 2022.

External links[edit]