Butyrophenone

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Butyrophenone
Butyrophenone.svg
Butyrophenone3d.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
1-Phenylbutan-1-one
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.007.091 Edit this at Wikidata
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C10H12O/c1-2-6-10(11)9-7-4-3-5-8-9/h3-5,7-8H,2,6H2,1H3 checkY
    Key: FFSAXUULYPJSKH-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/C10H12O/c1-2-6-10(11)9-7-4-3-5-8-9/h3-5,7-8H,2,6H2,1H3
    Key: FFSAXUULYPJSKH-UHFFFAOYAC
  • O=C(c1ccccc1)CCC
  • CCCC(=O)c1ccccc1
Properties
C10H12O
Molar mass 148.20 g/mol
Appearance clear liquid
Melting point 12 °C (54 °F; 285 K)
Boiling point 229 °C (444 °F; 502 K)
poor
log P 2.77
1.520
Hazards
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
1
1
1
Flash point 99 °C (210 °F; 372 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
checkY verify (what is checkY☒N ?)

Butyrophenone is an organic compound with the formula C6H5C(O)C3H7. It is a colorless liquid.

The butyrophenone structure—a ketone flanked by a phenyl ring and a butyl chain—forms the basis for many other chemicals containing various substituents. Some of these butyrophenones are used to treat various psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, as well as acting as antiemetics.[1]

Examples of butyrophenone-derived pharmaceuticals include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Keith Parker; Laurence Brunton Goodman; Louis Sanford; Lazo, John S.; Gilman, Alfred (2006). Goodman & Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics (11th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0071422803.
  2. ^ Grogan, Charles H.; Rice, Leonard M. (1967). "Ω-Azabicyclic Butyrophenones". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 10 (4): 621–623. doi:10.1021/jm00316a022. PMID 6037051.