CRIStin

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CRIStin
Type of site
Research information system
Available in
OwnerRoyal Ministry of Education and Research
Websitecristin.no
Launched2004; 16 years ago (2004)
Current statusActive

CRIStin (Current Research Information System in Norway) is the national research information system of Norway, and is owned by the Royal Ministry of Education and Research. CRIStin documents all scholarly publications by Norwegian researchers, and complements the BIBSYS database, which focuses on books. CRIStin is the first database of its kind worldwide.[1]

The CRIStin system includes the Norwegian Scientific Index, a comprehensive bibliographic database aimed at covering and rating all serious academic publication channels worldwide, including academic journals and publishers. The Norwegian Scientific Index is also used in other countries than Norway, e.g. in South Africa. It also serves as the basis for a joint Nordic bibliographic database that is being developed under the auspices of the Nordic governments and the Nordic Council. Additionally the European database ERIH PLUS is now a sister project of the Norwegian Scientific Index, after it was transferred from the European Science Foundation to the Norwegian Centre for Research Data in 2014.

History[edit]

The CRIStin system traces its roots to the research documentation system of the University of Oslo, that was developed during the 1990s and known as Forskningsdokumentasjon ved Universitetet i Oslo ("Research Documentation at the University of Oslo"), abbreviated ForskDok. Until 2010/2011 Norway had two competing research documentation databases. Almost all colleges and universities used the BIBSYS FORSKDOK database, that was developed from 1991 as part of the national BIBSYS system, itself established in 1972. However, the University of Oslo, the country's preeminent university, chose to develop its own and similarly named system.[2] In 2004 the research documentation system of the University of Oslo formed the basis for a joint system, renamed Frida, for the University of Oslo and the then three other Norwegian universities, but excluding the country's many colleges and other research institutions. In 2010 Frida was transferred to the government and became a national research documentation system, and was renamed CRIStin. The BIBSYS FORSKDOK database was then closed in 2011.

Norwegian Scientific Index[edit]

Ratings in the Norwegian Scientific Index
Rating Explanation
Level 2 The highest rating, reserved for
the internationally most prestigious
publication channels (journals and
publishers). A maximum of 20%
of (serious) publication channels
in a given discipline may be
given this rating. Generates
substantially increased funding.
Level 1 The standard rating, which designates
publication channels (journals and
publishers) as academic. Intended
to cover at least 80% of (serious)
publication channels in a given
discipline. Generates funding.
Level 0 The lowest rating, which designates
publication channels (journals and
publishers) as non-academic.
Generates no funding.

The Norwegian Scientific Index (Norwegian: Norsk vitenskapsindeks, NVI) is a comprehensive Norwegian bibliographic database established by the Norwegian government, aimed at covering all academic publication channels worldwide, i.e. academic journals, series with ISSN and scholarly presses. It is operated by the government-owned company Norwegian Centre for Research Data on behalf of the Royal Ministry of Education and Research, and forms one of the key parts that together make up the CRIStin system.

The index divides journals and publishers considered to meet academic quality criteria (including peer review) into "level 1" and "level 2." Level 1 is the standard rating for publication channels considered to meet academic quality criteria, and is intended to cover at least 80% of all serious journals and publishers in a given discipline. Level 2 is the highest rating and is reserved for the internationally[3] most prestigious journals and publishers within the discipline. "Level 2" status is granted by national expert committees for each discipline, and may be given to a maximum of 20% of all publication channels in a given discipline.

Funding of research institutions in Norway is partially tied to the Norwegian Scientific Index, and only recognised "level 1" or "level 2" publications generate funding. "Level 2" publications generate significantly increased funding compared to "level 1" publications.[4]

Journals and publishers that are designated as not academic are identified as "level 0," which means that they don't count in the official academic career system or public funding of research institutions. The "0" rating may imply that the publication channel lacks adequate peer review or that it in some other way doesn't meet basic quality standards for academic journals, that it is a trade journal with no academic aspirations or some other form of entirely non-academic publication, or that it is it is regarded as predatory. Such publication channels are not systematically included in the index, and the rating may, but doesn't necessarily, indicate that the publication channel was nominated for "level 1" status and failed to be approved as such, or that it has been downgraded from "level 1" status e.g. due to predatory publishing practices. Some Norwegian publications are included in the database and identified as level 0 mainly for legacy reasons, that is, they were included in the database's predecessors before the rating system was invented; they include a number of trade journals, newspapers and other non-academic publications.

The Norwegian Scientific Index is also used in other countries than Norway, both formally and informally. For example, South Africa started using the index in 2016.[5] The Norwegian Scientific Index also forms the basis for the Nordic List, a joint Nordic bibliographic database that is developed under the auspices of the Nordic Council and the governments of the Nordic countries.[6]

The responsibility for the European Reference Index for the Humanities and the Social Sciences, now called ERIH PLUS, was transferred from the European Science Foundation to the Norwegian Centre for Research Data in 2014 and is now available on the same website as the Norwegian Scientific Index.[7][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ All forskning i én kurv, Universitetsavisa, 23 November 2010
  2. ^ "Farvel til FORSKDOK?". Universitetsavisa.
  3. ^ With some exceptions for strongly nationally oriented disciplines, such as law and (Norwegian) history, where Level 2 status is given to the leading journals within Scandinavia
  4. ^ OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2010, p. 122
  5. ^ "Sør-Afrika vil ha norsk register". University of Bergen.
  6. ^ "The Nordic List". University of Bergen.
  7. ^ Grethe Tidemann, "Nytt register skal kvalitetssikre europeiske, vitenskapelige publikasjoner" [New index shall ensure the quality of European academic publications], Uniforum, 29 May 2015
  8. ^ "European Reference Index for the Humanities (ERIH)". European Science Foundation. Archived from the original on 2016-01-27. Retrieved 2016-02-02.

External links[edit]