Carenne School

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Carenne School
Location
Bathurst, New South Wales
Australia Australia
Coordinates 33°25′33″S 149°33′58″E / 33.42577°S 149.56614°E / -33.42577; 149.56614
Information
Type Public, Co-educational, Special, Day school
Motto Quality Education, Towards Independence
Established 1957
Principal Jane Crosland
Enrolment 81
Campus Rural
Colour(s) Royal Blue & Gold
         
Website

Carenne School is a school for disabled students in Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia. It was established in 1957[1] as Glenray School.[2] It has 81 students[3] and 30 staff.[4]

History[edit]

When Carenne was first established it was known as Glenray School and housed in a disused stable at the rear of the Uniting Church in Bathurst. It opened on 17 July 1957 with one teacher and eight students.[5] The school was independently owned by the Sub-Normal Children's Welfare Association.

In November, 1961 the school moved to its current location in Browning Street, Bathurst where it was housed in a building built from both volunteered labour and fundraised money. A donation was made to the school by the NSW government, allowing it to open at its new premises completely debt free. The education department became involved at this time, providing a teacher and equipment for one group of students and subsidising the other.[6]

In February, 1971 the school was purchased from the Sub-Normal Children's Welfate Association by the state education department.

In 1980, the school was greatly expanded with the construction of new classrooms and the name was changed from Glenray to Carenne.

Student sex affair[edit]

In 2010, it was found by the NSW District Court that a teacher at the school, Anna Blackburn was involved in a sexual relationship with a 17-year-old student of the school. The student sued the state of New South Wales and the teacher. Staff at the school denied having knowledge of the affair and the education department claimed the affair caused the student no further harm than his disability and that it was not reasonably foreseeable.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]