Carlo Peter Caputo

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Carlo Peter Caputo (September 15, 1903 – November 6, 1993) was a Palermo-born purported Italian-American gangster and notable Madison, Wisconsin based businessman.[1]

Early career[edit]

Arriving in Chicago, Caputo integrated himself into the Chicago Outfit, allegedly working between The Outfit and its offshoot in Milwaukee during the 1930s and 40s. At some point in the 1940s, Caputo relocated to Madison, Wisconsin where he settled into the Madison neighborhood of Greenbush, a large enclave of Sicilian and Jewish Immigrants. Caputo quickly purchased real estate in the area including several taverns and restaurants, gaining a reputation as a successful businessman.[2]

Later life and indictment[edit]

Long regarded by the FBI as the head of the Madison branch of La Cosa Nostra, in 1961 Caputo came under indictment from the federal government for tax evasion.[3]The case ended in Caputo serving 30 days in jail and receiving 23 months' probation.[4]

Former FBI Director William Sessions cited Caputo as the mob boss of Madison during a 1988 congressional hearing on organized crime.[5] Despite his brief imprisonment and Sessions' comments, Caputo continued to serve as a prominent member of the Madison business community and contributed to the development of the downtown area.[6]

Death[edit]

Caputo died of natural causes on November 9, 1993. Following his death, Caputo was considered by the FBI to have been the head of America's smallest mafia operation.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Murray, Catherine "Greenbush...remembered" May 2011, p. 104
  2. ^ "26 Mafia Cities - Madison, WI". Americanmafia.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  3. ^ "Page 29, Capital Times, May 5, 1967". NewspaperARCHIVE.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  4. ^ "CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF LA COSA NOSTRA IN THE UNITED STATES". "Organized Crime: 25 Years After Valachi," Hearings Before the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations of the Committee on Governmental Affairs, United States Senate, 100th Congress. October 1987. 
  5. ^ "Welcome Fortune City Customers | Dotster". Members.fortunecity.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  6. ^ AMANDA N. WEGNER For the State Journal (2008-05-28). "THROUGH THICK AND THIN MADISON'S PIZZARIAS HAVE COME A LONG WAY FROM THEIR HUMBLE START ON SPAGHETTI-CORNER : 77-square". Host.madison.com. Retrieved 2012-06-12. 
  7. ^ James Mannon, The Everything Mafia Book, FW Publications, 2003

External links[edit]