Chhadmabeshi

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Chhadmabeshi
Directed byAgradoot[a]
Produced byShib Narayan Dutta
Bibhuti Laha
Screenplay byMahendra Chakraborty
Subir Hajra
Story byUpendranath Ganguly
StarringUttam Kumar
Madhabi Mukherjee
Music bySudhin Dasgupta
CinematographyBaidyanath Basak
Bibhuti Laha
Edited byBaidyanath Chatterjee
Release date
  • 1971 (1971) (India)
Running time
122 minutes
CountryIndia
LanguageBengali

Chhadmabeshi (lit.'Disguised') is a 1971 Bengali comedy film directed by Agradoot,[a] starring Uttam Kumar and Madhabi Mukherjee as leads,[2] based on the story Chhadobeshi by writer Upendranath Ganguly.[citation needed] The story revolves around a newly married professor, who plays a practical joke upon his brother-in-law by posing as his family driver.

The film was remade in Hindi in 1975 as Chupke Chupke starring Dharmendra, Sharmila Tagore, and Amitabh Bachchan [3][4][5] and in Kannada in 2004 as Joke Falls.

Cast[edit]

Soundtrack[edit]

Chhadmabeshi
Soundtrack album

All music is composed by Sudhin Dasgupta[6].

Songs
No.TitlePlaybackLength
1."Amar Din Kate Na"Asha Bhonsle 
2."Aaro Dure Chalo Jai"Asha Bhonsle 
3."Ami Kon Pathe Je Chali"Manna Dey[7] 
4."Aare Chho Chho Kya Saramke Baat"Anup Ghoshal 
5."Banchaao Ke Aachho"Manna Dey 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The pen name of a group of Indian film technicians in Bengali cinema signing collectively as director.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yves Thoraval (1 February 2000). The Cinemas of India. Macmillan India. p. 237. ISBN 978-0-333-93410-4.
  2. ^ "Bengali cinema's all-time greatest comedy films". The Times of India.
  3. ^ Phukan, Vikram (7 December 2018). "Lights, camera, remake: How Bollywood has thrived with take-offs from Bengali originals". The Hindu.
  4. ^ "The films and me: Chupke Chupke vs Chhadmabeshi".
  5. ^ Ganguly, Ruman (27 November 2019). "Remakes of Bengali films: What's new in this trend?". The Times of India. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  6. ^ "Gaana: Chhadmabeshi songs".
  7. ^ "Manna Dey was the enigmatic 'Chhadmabeshi' of playback singing".

External links[edit]