Christian Cooper

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Christian Cooper
NationalityAmerican
Area(s)Writer, editor
Pseudonym(s)C F Cooper
Notable works
Songs of the Metamythos

Christian Cooper is an American science writer and editor, and also a comics writer and editor. He is based in New York City.

Career[edit]

Cooper has written stories for Marvel Comics Presents, which often feature characters such as Ghost Rider and Vengeance. He has also edited a number of X-Men collections,[1] and the final two issues of the Marvel Swimsuit Special.[2] Cooper is currently a senior biomedical editor at Health Science Communications.[3]

LGBTQ comics[edit]

Cooper was Marvel's first openly gay writer and editor.[4] He introduced the first gay male character in Star Trek, Yoshi Mishima, in the Starfleet Academy series,[4] which was nominated for a GLAAD Media Award in 1999.[5] He also introduced the first openly lesbian character for Marvel, Victoria Montesi[4][6] and created and authored Queer Nation: The Online Gay Comic.[7] Cooper was also an associate editor for Alpha Flight #106 in which the character Northstar came out as gay.[4][8]

Personal life[edit]

In the 1980s, he was president of the Harvard Ornithological Club, and is currently on the Board of Directors for NYC Audubon[9] Cooper has a long history of LGBT activism including being the co-chair of the board of directors of GLAAD in the 1980s.[10][11]

On May 25, 2020, Cooper played a key role in the Central Park birdwatching incident,[12] which led to the creation of Black Birders Week.[13] The incident is also the basis for his online graphic novel published by DC Comics about racism called "It's a Bird".[14]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Marvel Comics Presents:
    • "Return of the Braineaters" (featuring Ghost Rider and Werewolf by Night, with pencils by John Stanisci and inks by Jimmy Palmiotti, in Marvel Comics Presents #107–112, Marvel Comics, 1992)
    • "Siege of Darkness" (featuring Ghost Rider, with pencils by Reggie Jones and inks by Fred Harper, in Marvel Comics Presents #144–146, Marvel Comics, 1993–1994)
    • "Tower of Blood" (featuring Vengeance, with pencils by Reggie Jones and inks by Fred Harper, in Marvel Comics Presents #147–148, Marvel Comics, 1994)
    • "The Price" (featuring Vengeance, with Fred Harper, in Marvel Comics Presents #149, Marvel Comics, 1994)
    • "Dangerous Games" (featuring Vengeance, with pencils by Reggie Jones and inks by Fred Harper, in Marvel Comics Presents #152–153, Marvel Comics, 1994)
    • "Altered Spirits" (featuring Vengeance, with pencils by Reggie Jones and inks by Fred Harper, in Marvel Comics Presents #156–157, Marvel Comics, 1994)
    • "Final Gambit" (featuring Vengeance, with pencils by Reggie Jones and inks by Fred Harper, in Marvel Comics Presents #175, Marvel Comics, 1995)
  • Darkhold #1–16 (with Richard Case, Marvel Comics, 1992–1994)
  • Excalibur #77–81 (Marvel Comics, 1994)
  • Star Trek: Starfleet Academy #1–19 (with pencils by Chris Renaud and inks by Andy Lanning, Marvel Comics, 1996–1998)
  • Songs of the Metamythos (as C. F. Cooper)
  • "It's a Bird" (with Alitha E. Martinez, Mark Morales, Emilio Lopez, and Rob Clark Jr, DC Comics, 2020)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Maurice, Emma Powys (May 26, 2020). "White woman lied to police that an innocent Black man was threatening her. He just so happens to be a queer comic hero". PinkNews – Gay news, reviews and comment from the world's most read lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans news service. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  2. ^ Johnson, Rich (June 7, 2020). "Warren Ellis Remembers When Marvel Illustrated Swimsuit Went Gay". Bleeding Cool. Retrieved June 7, 2020.
  3. ^ Fink, Jenni (May 26, 2020). "Amy Cooper, White Woman Who Called Cops on Black Man in Central Park, Fired From Job at Franklin Templeton". Newsweek.
  4. ^ a b c d Weiss, Josh (June 6, 2020). "Christian Cooper, Central Park birder with roots at Marvel, looks back on pioneering LGBTQ comics". SYFY WIRE. Retrieved June 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "GLAAD". June 28, 2001. Archived from the original on June 28, 2001. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  6. ^ "Christian Cooper, victim in racist Central Park video, is a trailblazing gay editor". Metro Weekly. May 27, 2020. Retrieved May 28, 2020.
  7. ^ "'Black Gay Icon': Christian Cooper's Long History Of Activism Before Central Park Incident". NewsOne. May 27, 2020. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  8. ^ "Astonishing X-Men (2004) #51 | Comic Issues | Marvel". Marvel Entertainment. Retrieved June 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Board of Directors". www.nycaudubon.org. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  10. ^ Dunmore, Royce (May 27, 2020). "'Black Gay Icon': Christian Cooper's Long History Of Activism Before Central Park Incident". NewsOne. Retrieved June 8, 2020.
  11. ^ Milton, Josh (May 27, 2020). "The gay Black man targeted by a 'Central Park Karen' doesn't know if her 'racist actions' make her a racist person". PinkNews. Retrieved June 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "White Woman in Viral Central Park Video Issues Apology". NBC New York. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  13. ^ Willingham, AJ. "These Black nature lovers are busting stereotypes, one cool bird at a time". CNN. Retrieved June 5, 2020.
  14. ^ Nir, Sarah Maslin (September 9, 2020). "Central Park Birder Turns Clash Into Graphic Novel About Racism". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 9, 2020.

External links[edit]