Christian Fashion Week

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Christian Fashion Week was an annual fashion show that celebrated fashion from a Christian worldview. It is the first fashion week to claim faith as a basis. The organization and event was founded by entrepreneurs Jose Gomez, Mayra Brignoni, Wil Lugo, and Tamy Lugo,[1] all from Tampa, Florida.[2] The first annual event, Christian Fashion Week 2013, was held on February 8, 2013, and featured 8 designers from around the US.[3] The event attracted over 300 attendees and over 2,000 online viewers.

The event attracted an international audience after a syndicated story by the Associated Press was published on February 7, 2013.[4] The article cast a spotlight on designers debuting at the show such as Julia Chew and Alma Vidovic. Executive Director, Jose Gomez, stated: "Modesty is the right thing to do.... The fashion industry operates under certain assumptions, but there is an alternative."

Author and speaker Shari Braendel was a featured guest and speaker.

Expansion[edit]

In 2014, the organization expanded the event from two days to an entire week.[5] The event started with the first International Day of Prayer for Art and Fashion.[6] The week continued with various workshops and shopping days, culminating in two days of fashion shows in Tampa, Florida.

The event was covered by over 40 media outlets, including:

The event attracted over 10,000 online viewers and, according to the organization's Facebook page, led to a retail edition of the show in Atlanta during the 2014 International Christian Retail Show, held by the Christian Booksellers Association (CBA) [11] in partnership with Christians In Fashion.[12]

In 2015, the fashion event was covered by the New York Times.[13] At the time, Christian Fashion Week issued a statement saying that 2015 would be its last season.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jacobs, Alexandra (2015-04-01). "At Christian Fashion Week, Modesty Is One Policy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-06-08.
  2. ^ "About Christian Fashion Week". Christianfashionweek.com. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  3. ^ "Christian Fashion Week 2013". Christianfashionweek.com. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-28. Retrieved 2014-03-28.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "Christian Fashion Week 2014". Christianfashionweek.com. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  6. ^ "International Day of Prayer for Art and Fashion". Christianfashionweek.com. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  7. ^ "61 Things I Saw At Christian Fashion Week". Buzzfeed.com. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  8. ^ "If You Didn't Know Christian Fashion Week Was A Thing, You Do Now! - Perez Hilton". Perezhilton.com. 26 February 2014. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  9. ^ "Christian Fashion Week 2014 Kicks Off in Tampa; A Celebration of Modesty and Christ (LIVE STREAM)". Christianpost.com. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  10. ^ "Christian Fashion Week returns". Tbo.com. 2 February 2014. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  11. ^ "Christian Fashion Week". Facebook.com. Retrieved 3 December 2018.
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-28. Retrieved 2014-03-28.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  13. ^ Jacobs, Alexandra (2015-04-01). "At Christian Fashion Week, Modesty Is One Policy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-06-08.