Christine Primrose

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Christine Primrose in 2014

Christine Primrose (born 17 February 1950) is a Gaelic singer and music teacher. She was born in Carloway, Lewis, but she currently lives on the Isle of Skye.[1]

In interviews Primrose has stated that she has been singing since she was a small child, which is very typical in her family. She won a gold medal in sean-nós at the Royal National Mòd in 1974 and an award at the 1978 Pan Celtic Festival,[2] and, as was not common at the time, she took a degree in traditional Gaelic music, and she has been performing all around the world, especially in North America, Australia, New Zealand and in Europe. For example, she was at the Smithsonian Folklife Music Festival in Washington, D.C. with Alison Kinnaird.[3] Besides this, she was a member of Mac-Talla,[4] and she has presented television and radio programmes.

Currently, she is one of the most renowned singers in the Gaelic world and she still appears in concerts from time to time. Besides this, she has been working at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig since 1982, the year that the school began to offer full-time courses. At first she was a secretary, and since 1993 she has taught in the course Gaelic and Traditional Music (BA) and in short courses.[5]

Achievements[edit]

Records[edit]

  • Àite Mo Ghaoil (1982)
  • Quiet Tradition (with Alison Kinnaird) (1990)
  • Mairidh Gaol is Ceòl, (as part of Mac-Talla) (1994)
  • 'S Tu Nam Chuimhne (1995)
  • Gun Sireadh, Gun Iarraidh (2001)
  • Gràdh is Gonadh (2017)

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Urpeth, Peter. "The Compelling Gift." Folkmusic.net. The Living Tradition Magazine. Published 2001. Accessed 17 January 2017.
  2. ^ Artist Biography at Allmusic.com
  3. ^ "Christine Primrose." Temple Records. Accessed 17 January 2017.
  4. ^ "Mac-Talla -- Mairidh Gaol is Ceòl". Temple Records. Temple Records. Retrieved 18 January 2017. 
  5. ^ "Cùrsaichean Samhraidh 2017." (in Gàidhlig) SMO Official Website. Sabhal Mòr Ostaig. Accessed 17 January 2017.