Chryses (mythology)

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Chryses (/ˈkraɪsiːz/; Greek: Χρύσης Khrúsēs) was the name that may refer to one of the following figures in Greek mythology:

  • Chryses or Chrysen, son of Zeus and Isonoe, one of the Danaides.[1]
  • Chryses, succeeded Phlegyas as king of the Phlegyans. He was the son of Poseidon and Chrysogeneia, daughter of Almus, and the possible father of Minyas.[2]
  • Chryses, one of the four sons of Minos and Pareia. He lived in the island of Paros together with his three brothers: Eurymedon, Nephalion and Philolaus. When Heracles arrives at the port of the island during the execution of his ninth work, two of his men go ashore. The four brothers killed these two men without any reason. The hero, furious about this pointless act immediately landed and in turn slayed the sons of Minos.[3]
  • Chryses, Trojan priest and father of Chryseis[4]
  • Chryses, grandson of the precedent through Chryseis and Agamemnon. After his mother was released shortly as a prisoner and allowed to return to her hometown, she gave birth to Chryses in the city of Thebes in Asia Minor. Many years later, Orestes arrived with Iphigenia and Pylades to Zminthe and were seized by Chryses, who decided to return them to King Thoas and the Taurians. But through his grandfather Chryses, he learned that they were also children of Agamemnon. So Chryses, joining his forces to those of his half-brother Orestes, attacked the Taurians and killed their king Thoas. After this, Chryses goes with Orestes and Iphigenia to Mycenae to visit the grave of their father Agamemnon. Yet some say that the father of Chryses was Apollo.[5]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Pseudo-Clement, Recognitions 10.21
  2. ^ Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 9.36.4
  3. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 2.5.9 & 3.1.2
  4. ^ Homer, Iliad 1.10 ff.
  5. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 120-121

References[edit]

  • Gaius Julius Hyginus, Fabulae from The Myths of Hyginus translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
  • Homer, The Iliad with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, Ph.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1924. . Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Homer, Homeri Opera in five volumes. Oxford, Oxford University Press. 1920. ISBN 978-0198145318. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pausanias, Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. ISBN 0-674-99328-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio. 3 vols. Leipzig, Teubner. 1903. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pseudo-Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Pseudo-Clement, Recognitions from Ante-Nicene Library Volume 8, translated by Smith, Rev. Thomas. T. & T. Clark, Edinburgh. 1867. Online version at theio.com