Claw tool

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The claw tool is a forcible entry tool used by firefighters. The tool was a major component in the Fire Department of New York during the early 20th century. Over the last fifty years, the claw tool has lost prominence due to the advent of newer and more efficient forcible entry tools.[1][2]

History[edit]

The exact origin of the claw tool is not well documented, however most in the FDNY agree on its folklorish origin. As the story goes, a fire was started in a lower Manhattan bank in order to cover-up a burglary. Within the rubble, firefighters found an odd tool with a claw-like end. Upon investigation, it was determined that the tool was used by the burglars to break into the bank. The firefighters had thought that if the tool was good enough to break into a bank, it was good enough for their use. This unusual tool was labeled "The claw tool". Soon the claw tool was reproduced many times over, and became the primary forcible entry tool used by the FDNY.[3] It is believed that the claw tool was the first tool designed solely for forcible entry.

Design and use[edit]

The original claw tool weighed 12 pounds and was approximately 36 inches in length. It was designed with a claw on one end and a tapered fork on the other end.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ FDNY Forcible Entry Manual page 13 Archived 2013-01-20 at the Wayback Machine Accessed: 6/14/2012
  2. ^ Merriam-Webster "Claw Tool" Accessed: 6/14/2012
  3. ^ FDNY Forcible Entry Manual Page 14 Archived 2013-01-20 at the Wayback Machine Accessed: 6/14/2012
  4. ^ FDNY Forcible Entry Manual Page 14 Archived 2013-01-20 at the Wayback Machine Accessed: 6/14/2012