Clay-with-Flints

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In geology, Clay-with-Flints was the name given by W. Whitaker in 1861 to a peculiar deposit of stiff red, brown or yellow clay containing unworn whole flints as well as angular shattered fragments, also with a variable admixture of rounded flint, quartz, quartzite and other pebbles.

Occurrence[edit]

The Formation is associated with deposits of the Chalk Group, subsequent Palaeogene and Neogene strata, and occasionally Upper Greensand.

Formation[edit]

The formation is now considered to be a combination of residual and cryoturbated strata, and to be of a variety of ages.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Anon. "Clay-with Flints formation". The BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units. BGS. Retrieved 03/05/2017.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  2. ^ Gallois, R. W. (2009). "The origin of the Clay-with-flints: the missing link". Geoscience in South-West England. 12: 153–161.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help);

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Clay-with-Flints". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.