Compeed

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Compeed
OwnerHRA Pharma (2017)
CountryDenmark
Introduced1986 (1986)
MarketsWorld
Previous ownersColoplast
Websitewww.compeed.com

Compeed is a brand of hydrocolloid gel plasters for treating blisters,[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10] corns,[11][12] cracked heels[13] and cold sores.[14][15][16][17] It has been developed in Denmark by Coloplast A/S. The brand was sold to Johnson & Johnson in May 2002[18] and HRA pharma acquired Compeed in 2017 from Johnson & Johnson but Compeed plasters are still manufactured by Coloplast.[19]

The product originally was designed for treating ostomy patients.[20]

History[edit]

1981 - Development of the skin barrier for bandaging purposes based on hydrocolloid technology started at Coloplast.[21]

1986 - Compeed registered in the USA in the category of antiseptic cleaning tissues as a trademark under serial number 73589785.[22]

1988 - Compeed got FDA approval.[23]

2002 - "Compeed X-TREME Flex" plaster by Jan Marcussen included into MoMA design collection.[24]

2002 - The brand sold to Johnson & Johnson in May 2002[18]

2004 - "Compeed X-TREME Flex" plaster wins Danish Design Award.[25][26]

Technology[edit]

Hydrocolloidal plaster contains croscarmellose sodium (an internally cross-linked sodium carboxymethylcellulose,[27] water-soluble polymer), and tackifier resins.[28] Top level of plaster is made of elastomer (that ensures that the plaster stays on skin even while moving) and polyurethane film.[29]

When applied to the blister, it starts to absorb body liquids turning into a soft mass that cushions the blister. It seals the blister forming so-called "second skin". The plaster doesn't heal the wound. It prevents the blister from developing and helps new skin to grow underneath the plaster.

Cushioned zone created by the plaster relieves pain and protects the wound from rubbing. The plaster repels water, and stops dirt and germs from entering the wound, thus preventing infection.

At first the plaster absorbs all the moisture from the blister but over time it becomes more permeable so the wound dries out.[27] Unlike ordinary dressings hydrocolloidal plaster stays on the wound for several days and it stays on even in the shower.

Corn removing plaster works in a similar way. Only that it absorbs the moisture resulting from salicylic acid acting on the corn (dissolving it).

Product range[edit]

Consumer research[edit]

Compeed conducts consumer insight researches.

2014 research showed that British women own 25 pairs of shoes but 5 of them are never used because they are too painful to wear.[30]

2012 research indicated that 58 percent of women take off their shoes during a night out because of the pain.[31] It also showed that the average heel worn by British women is 3.3 inches - highest heels across Europe.[32]

Endorsers[edit]

Compeed endorsers include tennis players Roger Federer[33] and Caroline Wozniacki[34][35][36] as well as British actress Victoria Shalet.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard T. Braver. "Treatment Solutions For Common Soccer Injuries". www.podiatrytoday.com/. Podiatry Today, Volume 16 - Issue 10 - October 2003. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15. Furthermore, using cushioned insoles or a blister protection pad like Blister Guard, Compeed products, Second Skin or using Skin Lube helps ward off friction and reduce blister recurrence.
  2. ^ Goodyer, Larry I. (2004). "Medical kits, first aid and minor medical conditions". Travel Medicine for Health Professionals. Pharmaceutical Press. p. 294. ISBN 9780853695110. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  3. ^ Weiss, Eric A.; Jacobs, Michael E. (2012). "Treatment of Large or Ruptured Blisters". Marine Medicine: A Comprehensive Guide. The Mountaineers Books. ISBN 978-1594856600. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  4. ^ Bahr, Roald (2012). "Foot:Blisters". The IOC Manual of Sports Injuries: An Illustrated Guide to the Management of Injuries in Physical Activity. John Wiley & Sons. p. 466. ISBN 978-0470674161. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  5. ^ Dawood, Richard (2012). "Foot care: Preventing blisters". Travellers' Health: How to stay healthy abroad. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0192629470. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  6. ^ Adby, Terry; Johnson, Stuart (2013). "First Aid Kit". The Hillwalker's Guide to Mountaineering: Essential Skills for Britain's classic routes. Cicerone Press Limited. ISBN 978-1852843939. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  7. ^ Auerbach, Paul S. (2013). "Blisters:Treatment". Field Guide to Wilderness Medicine. Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 250. ISBN 978-0-323-10045-8. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  8. ^ Zuckerman, Jane N. (2012). "Skin Problems and Foot Care". Principles and Practice of Travel Medicine, 2nd Edition. Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 978-1-4051-9763-2. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  9. ^ Buck Tilton (1995). Blister Shields. Backpacker, Oct 1995.
  10. ^ Warrell, D. A.; Anderson, Sarah.; Anderson, Sarah R. (2003). Expedition Medicine. Taylor & Francis. p. 140. ISBN 978-0-19-852950-7. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  11. ^ K Springett; M Deane; P Dancaster. "Treatment of corns, calluses and heel fissures with a hydrocolloid dressing". www.istic.ac.cn/. The Journal of British Podiatric Medicine, 1997 (52) ,7. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15. A hydrocolloid dressing (Compeed) was applied to corns, calluses and heel fissures in 43 symptomatic patients to assess the effects of creating optimum skin hydration levels. Resolution or lesion improvement was recorded by State Registered Chiropodists, along with participants' opinion of pain relief and ease of dressing use. At the end of the study, 57 of corns were reported to be improving, with 21 of these to have cleared; 71 of calluses improved and 14 of these cleared; 87 heel fissures improved and 47 of these healed. All participants noted a marked reduction of pain with use of the dressing which they considered very convenient to use.
  12. ^ Nathan, Alan (2010). "Corns and calluses". Non-prescription Medicines. Pharmaceutical Press. pp. 40–41. ISBN 978-0853698869. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  13. ^ Kim Jones (2013-03-20). "Shhh: Products to help you become Sleeping Beauty". Daily Mirror. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15. Compeed Overnight Cracked Heel Cream, £4.49, from pharmacies, contains urea and lactic acid to slough away any rough skin. Wear clean cotton socks after applying the cream for maximum bedtime effects.
  14. ^ Rutter, Paul (2013). "Evidence base for over-the-counter medication". Community Pharmacy: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment. Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 238. ISBN 978-0702029950. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  15. ^ Nathan, Alan (2010). "Cold sores". Non-prescription Medicines. Pharmaceutical Press. pp. 40–41. ISBN 978-0853698869. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  16. ^ Karlsmark T, Goodman JJ, Drouault Y, Lufrano L, Pledger GW. "Randomized clinical study comparing Compeed cold sore patch to acyclovir cream 5% in the treatment of herpes simplex labialis". J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology,2008 Nov;22(10). 22: 1184–92. doi:10.1111/j.1468-3083.2008.02761.x. PMID 18462303.
  17. ^ Christine Clark (2013). "Pharmacy Magazine: CPD Module, Module 173" (PDF). The Pharmacy Magazine Learning. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15. An alternative approach is to use a thin hydrocolloid dressing (Compeed cold sore patch) on the cold sore. In a randomised trial comparing the patches with aciclovir cream 5%, there was no difference in median healing times but participants reported a high level of protection, less noticeable lesions and greater relief of social embarrassment.
  18. ^ a b "Compeed X-TREME Flex". Coloplast A/S sells Coloplast Consumer Products A/S to Johnson & Johnson. Nordic Business Report. 2002-05-15. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  19. ^ "Coloplast A/S 9M 2011/12 Financial Statements Chaired by Lars Rasmussen" (PDF). Coloplast A/S sells Coloplast Consumer Products A/S to Johnson & Johnson. Coloplast. 2012-08-15. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15. Regarding Compeed, actually Compeed was a product which was invented by Coloplast many years back and which we tried to sell ourselves for many years through an over the counter general. At the end of the day we realised that was not our business and therefore we sold it off to Johnson & Johnson I think 11 years ago. At that point in time, because we have proprietary technology there, we made an agreement to still keep producing this product. So it is a product where we are sole suppliers for it. They have a lot of other stuff under the Compeed brand but this specific product line, we are the only ones that supply that and, as such, we sort of live and die with this business with them.
  20. ^ Hougaard, Soren (2006). "Occurrences in a diagnostic perspective". The Business Idea: The Early Stages of Entrepreneurship. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 55. ISBN 9783540269595. Retrieved 2014-09-18.
  21. ^ "US4367732 (A) - Skin barrier". Espacenet. Archived from the original on 2014-09-18. Retrieved 2014-09-18.
  22. ^ "Compeed". uspto.gov. United States Patent and Trademark Office. Archived from the original on 2014-09-18. Retrieved 2014-09-18.
  23. ^ "FDA 510(k) Application Details - K883588". Food and Drug Administration. 1988. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  24. ^ "Compeed X-TREME Flex". www.moma.org. Museum of Modern Art. 2002. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  25. ^ "Winners 2000-2011//Danish Design Award 2012" (PDF). ddc.dk/. Danish Design Centre. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  26. ^ Tina Bryld (2004). "Masser af prisværdigt dansk design" (in Danish). Jyllands-Posten. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  27. ^ a b Chris Woodford (2014-05-12). "Blister plasters and hydrocolloidal dressings". www.explainthatstuff.com/. Explainthatstuff.com. Archived from the original on 2014-08-17. Retrieved 2014-08-17.
  28. ^ "Bandage for covering area of skin and which may be permanently stretched and shaped to the anatomical contour: US 6297423 B1". www.google.com/patents. Google Patents. 2001-10-02. Archived from the original on 2014-08-17. Retrieved 2014-08-17.
  29. ^ "Blister dressing including a hydrocolloid adhesive body: WO 2011135256 A". www.google.com/patents. Google Patents. 2011-11-03. Archived from the original on 2014-08-17. Retrieved 2014-08-17.
  30. ^ Katy Winter (2014-06-24). "Will we ever learn? British women buy 17 pairs of shoes every year but five will remain unused because they are too painful". Daily Mail. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  31. ^ "Stiletto shoes come at a high price". The Daily Telegraph (Sydney). Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  32. ^ "British women wear highest heels in Europe". The Daily Telegraph. 2012-07-20. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  33. ^ Nima Naderi. "Federer Receives Compeed Elegance Award". Tennisconnected.Com. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  34. ^ Bobby Chintapalli (2011-05-20). "Soft power: Caroline Wozniacki takes different route to the top". USA Today. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  35. ^ "World No.1 Wozniacki Joins With COMPEED". WTATennis.com. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.
  36. ^ "Stay unstoppable with my new COMPEED® blister pat". Carolinewozniacki.Dk. Archived from the original on 2014-08-15. Retrieved 2014-08-15.