Corvi-Mora

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Corvi-Mora
Corvi-Mora logo.svg
Established19 January 2000; 19 years ago (2000-01-19)
LocationLondon, SE11
Coordinates51°29′28″N 0°06′30″W / 51.491168°N 0.108423°W / 51.491168; -0.108423Coordinates: 51°29′28″N 0°06′30″W / 51.491168°N 0.108423°W / 51.491168; -0.108423
TypeArt Gallery, Modern Art, Contemporary Art
FounderTommaso Corvi-Mora
Public transit accessLondon Underground Kennington
London Underground National Rail Elephant & Castle
Websitewww.corvi-mora.com

Corvi-Mora is a contemporary art gallery based in Kennington, South London.[1] The gallery represents emerging and established international artists including Turner Prize nominees Roger Hiorns[2][3] and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye[4][5].

History[edit]

Corvi-Mora was founded by Tommaso Corvi-Mora in 2000 at premises in London's Warren Street[6] after the closure of the gallery Robert Prime which he founded in partnership with Gregorio Magnani in 1995.[7][8] Corvi-Mora moved to a space on Kempsford Road in 2004 with the contemporary art gallery greengrassi.[9][10][11].

Notable exhibitions include Sorrow for A Cipher by Lynette Yiadom-Boakye in 2016[12][13], Roger Hiorns in 2004[14] and 2015[15], The Commune Itself Becomes a Super State by Liam Gillick in 2007[16], Rachel Feinstein in 2007.[17] and Richard Hawkins in 2009[18]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Milliard, Coline (September 2017). "Embattled London Art Market Has Become a Testing Ground for New Gallery Models". Artsy. Artsy, Inc. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  2. ^ Benedictus, Leo (7 December 2009). "Roger Hiorns: Turner prize profile". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  3. ^ Douglas, Caroline (1 May 2015). "Friday Dispatch: Roger Hiorns at Corvi-Mora, London". Contemporary Art Society. Contemporary Art Society, London. Retrieved 1 December 2017. Walk in to the cool, top-lit ground floor space at Corvi-Mora right now and you are likely to experience a jolt of keen optical pleasure.
  4. ^ Higgins, Charlotte (25 April 2013). "Turner prize 2013 shortlist takes a mischievous turn". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  5. ^ Kazanjian, Dodie (27 March 2017). "How British-Ghanaian Artist Lynette Yiadom-Boakye Portrays Black Lives in Her Paintings". Vogue. London / New York: Condé Nast. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  6. ^ "Going out: Pick of the Week". Guardian G2 Magazine. London: Guardian Media Grou. 16 September 2002. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  7. ^ Lomax, Jenni (16 February 2016). "Medium-specific: Ceramics in Contemporary Art". ICA. Institute of Contemporary Arts, London. Retrieved 1 December 2017. In 1995 Tommaso Corvi-Mora opened London gallery with Gregorio Magnani.
  8. ^ "Book Launch: Vitamin C: Clay and Ceramic in Contemporary Art". Camden Arts Centre. 15 November 2017. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  9. ^ "Corvi-Mora Current and Upcoming Shows". Frieze. Frieze Publishing Limited. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  10. ^ "greengrassi Current and Upcoming Shows". Frieze. Frieze Publishing Limited. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  11. ^ Hume, Lucy (5 December 2016). Debrett's People of Today: 2017. London: Debrett's Ltd. p. 6710. ISBN 978-0992934873.
  12. ^ Alice, Primrose (9 September 2016). "Our pick of this week's art events: 9 – 15 September". Royal Academy. The Royal Academy of Arts, London. Retrieved 1 December 2017. Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Sorrow for a Cipher, Corvi-Mora Gallery, London, until 8 October
  13. ^ Corvi-Mora, Tommaso (30 August 2016). "Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Sorrow For A Cipher, 9 Sep 2016 – 8 Oct 2016". ArtRabbit. ArtRabbit Ltd, London. Retrieved 1 December 2017. Tommaso Corvi-Mora is pleased to present new work by Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. The exhibition features a new group of paintings, including portraits and figures in landscapes.
  14. ^ Dan, Fox (1 January 2004). "Review: Roger Hiorns - Corvi-Mora, London, UK". Frieze Magazine. London, New York, Berlin: Frieze Publishing Limited. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  15. ^ Beaumont, Grace (1 June 2015). "Roger Hiorns at Corvi-Mora". Artforum International Magazine, New York, NY. New York, NY: Artforum International Magazine. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  16. ^ Grovier, Kelly (1 April 2016). "Liam Gillick: Returning to an Abandoned Plant". Tate. Tate Gallery, London. Retrieved 1 December 2017. Created in the artist’s London studio, the sculpture first appeared in March 2007 at the Corvi Mora Gallery, London.
  17. ^ O’Reilly, Sally (1 September 2007). "Review: Rachel Feinstein". ieze Magazine. London, New York, Berlin: Frieze Publishing Limited. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  18. ^ "Roger Hiorns". ArtReview. London: ArtReview Ltd. 1 April 2009. Retrieved 1 December 2017.