Cyrille Aimée

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Cyrille Aimée
Cyrille Aimee concert 19.jpg
Background information
Birth nameCyrille Aimée Daudel
Born (1984-08-10) August 10, 1984 (age 36)
Samois-sur-Seine, Fontainebleau, France
GenresJazz
Occupation(s)Singer
InstrumentsVocals
LabelsMack Avenue
Websitewww.cyrillemusic.com

Cyrille Aimée (French: [si.ʁil ɛ.me]; born August 10, 1984) is a French jazz singer.[1][2][3]

Biography[edit]

She grew up in the French town of Samois-sur-Seine, in Fontainebleau, France.[4] Her father is French and her mother is from the Dominican Republic.[5]

She won the Montreux Jazz Festival Competition in 2007,[4] was a finalist in the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition in 2010,[2][6] and won the Sarah Vaughan International Jazz Competition in 2012.

Her 2019 album Move On featured cover versions of songs by Stephen Sondheim. The album received praise from Sondheim himself, and one of its songs was nominated for a Grammy Award.[7]

Critical reception[edit]

New York Times music reviewer Stephen Holden described Aimée as a blend of Michael Jackson and Sarah Vaughan and wrote that the "saucy, curly-haired jazz singer [stood] with one foot in tradition and the other in electronics," and that her voice had a "tart, girlish chirp" and that her Surreal Band fused traditional and futuristic electronics with textures mixing jazz and funk.[5] New York Times reviewer Nate Chinen wrote that she had a "sweet, girlish voice that she controls with a sniper's precision".[8]

Star-Ledger reviewer Ronni Reich described her sound as "instantly recognizable" with a "soft, girlish buzz with a touch of an Edith Piaf-like quaver."[4] Reviewer John Fordham in The Guardian wrote that she is a "subtle and articulate vocalist" who is "light-stepping, casually fluent and persuasive" and sometimes "coolly understated in a soft glide."[9] Classicalite reviewer Mike Greenblatt described Aimée as "beautiful, talented, precocious, funny, cultured, with the kind of instantly-recognizable voice that has no known precedent."[10]

Aimée was also singled out for particular praise for her role in Alex Webb (musician)'s music theatre piece Cafe Society Swing at New York's 59E59 Theaters in Christmas 2014, where she starred alongside vocalists Charenee Wade and Allan Harris. The show received a Critic's Pick in the New York Times.[11]

Discography[edit]

  • Cyrille Aimée and the Surreal Band (2009)
  • Smile (Cyrille Aimée Music, 2009) with Diego Figueiredo
  • Just the Two of Us (Venus, 2010) with Diego Figueiredo
  • Live at Small's (SmallsLIVE, 2010)
  • Live at Birdland (Cyrillemusic, 2013)
  • Burstin' Out, Chicago Jazz Orchestra with Cyrille Aimée (Origin, 2013)
  • It's a Good Day (Mack Avenue, 2014)
  • Let's Get Lost (Mack Avenue, 2016)
  • Cyrille Aimée Live (Mack Avenue, 2018)
  • Move On: A Sondheim Adventure (Mack Avenue, 2019)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pitz, Marylynne (3 September 2014). "French-Dominican vocalist Cyrille Aimee to entertain guests at Cultural Trust gala". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
  2. ^ a b Danton, Eric R. (2 September 2014). "Cyrille Aimee Goes Back to the Land in 'Bamboo Shoots' Video (Exclusive Premiere)". blog.wsj.com.
  3. ^ Gilbert, Andrew (26 Feb 2014). "Cyrille Aimée to fuse Gypsy, jazz spirits in Santa Cruz show". SF Gate.
  4. ^ a b c Reich, Ronni (21 October 2012). "Cyrille Aimee wins the first Sarah Vaughan International Jazz Competition". nj.com.
  5. ^ a b Holden, Stephen (23 November 2012). "Cyrille Aimée and the Surreal Band at Birdland". The New York Times.
  6. ^ "Cyrille Aimee: 'I Wish You Love'". The Washington Post. 5 October 2010.
  7. ^ Allen Morrison, "Cyrille Aimee Is Moving On", JazzTimes, December 2019.
  8. ^ Chinen, Nate (15 August 2014). "Albums From Eric Harland's Voyager, Bobby Broom and More". The New York Times.
  9. ^ Fordham, John (11 August 2011). "Cyrille Aimée and Friends: Live at Smalls – review". The Guardian.
  10. ^ Greenblatt, Mike (29 January 2016). "Blogarrhea Exclusive Interview: Cyrille Aimee – A Woman to Love in Three Languages". Classical Lite.
  11. ^ "Rich Songs Tell a Jazz Club's Bittersweet Story". nytimes.com/. 23 December 2014. Retrieved 2015-06-22.

External links[edit]