D band

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D band
NATO D band
Frequency range
1–2 GHz
Wavelength range
30–15 cm
Related bands
  • L (IEEE)
  • UHF (ITU)
Waveguide D band
Frequency range
110–170 GHz
Wavelength range
2.73–1.76 mm
Related bands

NATO D band[edit]

The NATO D band is the obsolete designation given to the radio frequencies from 1 000 to 2 000 MHz (equivalent to wavelengths between 30 and 15 cm) during the cold war period. Since 1992 frequency allocations, allotment and assignments are in line to NATO Joint Civil/Military Frequency Agreement (NJFA).[1] However, in order to identify military radio spectrum requirements, e.g. for crises management planning, training, Electronic warfare activities, or in military operations, this system is still in use.

NATO Radio spectrum designation
LATEST SYSTEM ALTERNATIVE SYSTEM
BAND FREQUENCY (MHz) BAND FREQUENCY (MHz)
A 0 – 250 I 100 – 150
B 250 – 500 G 150 – 225
C 500 – 1 000 P 225 – 390
D 1 000 – 2 000 L 390 – 1 550
E 2 000 – 3 000 S 1 550 – 3 900
F 3 000 – 4 000 C 3 900 – 6 200
G 4 000 – 6 000 X 6 200 – 10 900
H 6 000 – 8 000 K 10 900 – 36 000
I 8 000 – 10 000 Ku 10 900 – 20 000
J 10 000 – 20 000 Ka 20 000 – 36 000
K 20 000 – 40 000 Q 36 000 – 46 000
L 40 000 – 60 000 V 46 000 – 56 000
M 60 000 – 100 000 W 56 000 – 100 000

Waveguide D band[edit]

The waveguide D band is the range of radio frequencies from 110 GHz to 170 GHz in the electromagnetic spectrum,[2][3] corresponding to the recommended frequency band of operation of the WR6 and WR7 waveguides.[4] These frequencies are equivalent to wave lengths between 2.7 mm and 1.8 mm. The D band is in the EHF range of the radio spectrum.

This D-Band lies at the approach to upper frequency limit of contemporary electronic oscillator technology, between 110 and 170 GHz.

References[edit]

  1. ^ NATO Joint Civil/Military Frequency Agreement (NJFA)
  2. ^ Victor L. Granatstein (26 March 2012). Physical Principles of Wireless Communications, Second Edition. CRC Press. p. 6. ISBN 978-1-4398-7897-2. 
  3. ^ Jonathan Wells (2010). Multigigabit Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Wireless Communications. Artech House. p. 4. ISBN 978-1-60807-083-1. 
  4. ^ "Rectangular waveguide dimensions". Microwaves Encyclopedia. P-N Designs, Inc. 2012-11-03. Retrieved 2014-03-02.