Dan Coleman (composer)

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Dan Coleman (born January 12, 1972, in New York City) is a composer and music publisher.

He studied music at the University of Pennsylvania, the Juilliard School, and the Aspen Music Festival and School where his teachers included George Tsontakis, George Crumb, William Bolcom, Robert Beaser, Stephen Albert and Bruce Adolphe.[1] In 1994 he won the Young Concert Artists composition competition.[2]

His music has been commissioned and performed by leading ensembles, including the American Composers Orchestra, The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Cypress String Quartet, Dallas Symphony, Fresno Philharmonic, Honolulu Symphony, Indianapolis Symphony, Knoxville Symphony Orchestra, Mesa Symphony, New York Chamber Symphony, Orpheus, Pacific Northwest Ballet, San Jose Chamber Orchestra, San Luis Obispo Mozart Festival Orchestra, Seattle Chamber Music Society, St. Luke's Chamber Ensemble, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra,[3] Utah Symphony, and the Tucson Symphony Orchestra, where he has held the post of composer-in-residence since 2002.[4]

In 2004 he and Bob Donnelly founded Modern Works Music Publishing, an independent music publishing administrator.

Selected works[edit]

Orchestra
  • long ago, this radiant day (1994)
  • Chamber Symphony (1997)
  • The Voice of the Rain (1997)
  • Focoso (2002)
  • L'alma respira (2002)[5]
Concertante
  • Pavanes and Symmetries for flute and string orchestra (2000)
Chamber music
  • Dezembrum for viola and cello (1992)
  • The Only Dance There Is for violin and piano (1993)
  • Sonata in Two Acts for violin and piano (1996)
  • Sonata notturna for violin and piano (1997)
  • Sad and Ancient Phrases for violin and piano (1999)
  • String Quartet No. 1 "Quartetto ricercare" (1999, revised 2003)
  • "Quintet (after Elizabeth Bishop)" (2001)
  • Summer for viola and piano (2003)
  • String Quartet No. 2 (2004)
  • String Quartet No. 3 "together, as the river" (2016)
Piano
  • Burden of Dreams (1993)
  • Quasi fantasia (1998)
  • Night Singing (2005)

Awards and honors[edit]

Dan Coleman has been the recipient of several awards and honors:[6]

  • 2004 Copland House / Sylvia Goldstein Award[7]
  • 2003 Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra / Marilyn K. Glick Composer's Award[8]
  • 2001 NFMC Beyer Composition Award[9]
  • 2001 Symphony in C Composer's Competition[10]
  • 2001 Auros Group for New Music Composer Award
  • 2001 New Music USA (Meet The Composer) Music Alive Grant[11]
  • 2000 Arizona Commission on the Arts Fellowship
  • 1999 Tisch School First Run Festival Best Original Score
  • 1998 Whitaker Commission from the American Composers Orchestra
  • 1997 Victor Herbert/ASCAP award for his Sonata in Two Acts
  • 1996 grant from Commissioning Music/USA (a partnership between the NEA, Meet The Composer and the Helen F. Whitaker Fund)
  • 1995 Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters[12]

Selected discography[edit]

[13]

as composer
  • 1995 Metamorphosen Chamber Orchestra (Albany Records 194)
  • 2004 Kevin Cobb "One" (Summit Records 401)
  • 2006 Sheila Browne & Wesley Baldwin "Lutoslawski, Clarke, Beethoven, Hindesmith, Coleman, Piston: Works for Viola & Cello" (Centaur 2798)
  • 2015 Jennifer Frautschi & John Blacklow "American Duos" (Albany Records 1593)
as arranger
as conductor

References[edit]

  1. ^ American Composers Orchestra Website, retrieved 19 May 2010
  2. ^ Young Concert Artists website, retrieved 28 October 2012
  3. ^ SPCO Archive, retrieved 28 October 2012
  4. ^ Tucson Symphony Website, retrieved 28 October 2012
  5. ^ New York Times, retrieved 19 May 2010
  6. ^ CrossSound Festival website, retrieved 2 April 2010
  7. ^ Copland House website, retrieved 17 July 2016
  8. ^ Glick Award guidelines, retrieved 17 July 2016
  9. ^ "NFMC website, retrieved 17 July 2016". Archived from the original on 11 March 2012. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
  10. ^ "Symphony in C website, retrieved 17 July 2016". Archived from the original on 2 May 2012. Retrieved 31 March 2012.
  11. ^ New Music USA website, retrieved 17 July 2016
  12. ^ American Academy of Arts and Letters website, retrieved 19 May 2010 Archived 31 January 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  13. ^ All Music Guide, retrieved 17 July 2016

External links[edit]