Daniel Akenine

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Daniel Akenine (in the middle) at the annual Stockholm meeting, May 23'th 2013 together with the principal of the Royal Institute of Technology Peter Gudmundson and the Mayor of Stockholm Karin Wanngård.
Daniel Akenine (in the middle) at the annual Stockholm meeting, May 23'th 2013 together with the principal of the Royal Institute of Technology Peter Gudmundson and the Mayor of Stockholm Karin Wanngård.
Born (1974-01-17) January 17, 1974 (age 48)
Sweden
OccupationWriter; technology officer Microsoft

Daniel Akenine (born January 17, 1974, in Sweden) is an author, IT architect and former researcher in neurophysics. In 2008 he was ranked by IDG as one of "Sweden’s top 10 developers/architects"[1] and the same year appointed as National Technology Officer at Microsoft.[2]

In 2015 Daniel received an IASA Fellowship for his work in the field of IT-architecture – one of the highest international awards in the field with profiles as Grady Booch as former recipients.[3] In 2018 the newspapers Ny Teknik[4] and Voister[5] described Akenine as one of the developers of the technology behind blockchain. In 2019 Daniel was appointed member of the Swedish commission for digitalization[6] by the Minister of Digital development and in 2022 he was ranked as one of Sweden's 50 most influential persons in tech.[7]

Biography[edit]

Akenine is a graduate of Lund University where he studied engineering physics, economics and law. After graduating Akenine began his career in a research group at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, working with mathematical models of the human brain. During a later period at the Royal Institute of Technology, Akenine developed and launched one of the first anonymization services for Internet users. A service later acquired.[8] During his time at the Nasdaq stock exchange, Akenine developed and patented the cryptographic algorithm SecureLog[9] – today mainly used in the financial sector to protect digital logs from tampering.

Akenine is the former chairman for the Swedish IT architect organization which he co-founded in 2007.[10] He is a frequent commentator on matters of IT and privacy and a member in the international ISO:s expert committee for cloud standards.[11]

Authorship[edit]

After writing mostly non-fiction books Akenine debuted in 2014 with the thriller 11 grams of truth. The novel is about a man named Simian, using big data, psychology and machine learning to succeed in manipulating our world towards a predetermined future. The rights to the book were sold to the United States before it was published[12] and Akenine was named by Aftonbladet, the largest newspaper in Sweden, as one of three debutants not to miss in 2014.[13]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Fundamentals of IT-architecture (ISBN 9789176972458, 2022)
  • Humans and AI (ISBN 9789177854043, 2018)
  • 11 grams of truth (ISBN 9789186775933, 2014)
  • The IT-architecture book (ISBN 9789175579535, 2014)
  • Integrity (Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse, 2014)
  • Migrating to the Cloud (ISBN 978-3826692246, 2013)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ten top developers". Computer Sweden.
  2. ^ Stefan Bohlin. "Daniel Akenine new CTO at Microsoft". IDG.
  3. ^ "Iasa Global announces new Iasa Fellow Daniel Akenine". December 27, 2016.
  4. ^ "Svenskarna som byggde en blockkedja långt innan bitcoin". Ny Teknik (in Swedish). Retrieved August 7, 2018.
  5. ^ "Mannen som grundade blockkedjan". Voister. Retrieved August 7, 2018.
  6. ^ "Nya ledamöter i regeringens Digitaliseringsråd". Archived from the original on July 4, 2019.
  7. ^ "Tech50 2022". Tech Awards Sweden. Retrieved October 20, 2022.
  8. ^ Karin Lindström. "IT professions need to be clearer". Computer Sweden.
  9. ^ Google Patent Search. "System and method for proving time and content of digital data in a monitored system". USPTO. {{cite web}}: |last= has generic name (help)
  10. ^ "IASA Sweden".
  11. ^ Hö (2012). Cloud Migration, Google Books. ISBN 9783826692253.
  12. ^ "Microsoft Security chief writes a book about our surveillance society". Hoi Publishing.
  13. ^ Cecilia Gustavsson. "Here are the books you do not want to miss". Aftonbladet.