David Altshuler

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David Altshuler
David Altshuler.jpg
Born David Matthew Altshuler
Ithaca, NY
Residence Brookline, MA
Institutions
Alma mater
Thesis Endogenous retinal activities that influence the development of rod photoreceptors in vitro (1994)
Doctoral advisor Connie Cepko
Known for HapMap
Notable awards
Spouse Jill Suttenberg Altshuler
Website
www.vrtx.com/our-team/senior-management

David Matthew Altshuler is a clinical endocrinologist and human geneticist. He is Executive Vice President, Global Research and Chief Scientific Officer at Vertex Pharmaceuticals.[3] Prior to joining Vertex in 2014, he was at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT.,[4] and was a Professor of Genetics and Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and in the Department of Biology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was also a faculty member in the Department of Molecular Biology, Center for Human Genetic Research, and the Diabetes Unit, all at Massachusetts General Hospital. He was one of four Founding Core Members of the Broad Institute, and served as the Institute's Deputy Director, Chief Academic Officer, and Director of the Program in Medical and Population Genetics.[5][6]

Education[edit]

Altshuler attended Commonwealth School in Boston, received his Bachelor of Science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology,[7] his Ph.D from Harvard University, and his M.D. from Harvard Medical School.[8] He completed his internship, residency, and clinical fellowship training at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Research[edit]

Altshuler's academic research focused on human genetic variation and its application to disease,[9][10][11][12] using information from the Human Genome Project.[13] He has co-led the SNP Consortium, International HapMap Project,[14][15] and 1000 Genomes Project[16][17][18] His research focused on the genetic basis of Type 2 Diabetes, and his laboratory contributed to mapping dozens of gene variants that are associated with risk of Type 2 Diabetes, lipid levels, myocardial infarction, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, prostate cancer, and other disorders.

Awards and honors[edit]

Among his awards are election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the Institute of Medicine. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the American Society of Human Genetics and was previously a member of the board of Vertex Pharmaceuticals. In 2011 he won the Curt Stern Award of the American Society of Human Genetics, and in 2012 the Outstanding Scientific Achievement Award of the American Diabetes Association. He is a member of the board of trustees of Becket Chimney Corners YMCA.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chakravarti, A. (2012). "2011 Introduction to Curt Stern Award". The American Journal of Human Genetics. 90 (3): 405–406. PMC 3309201Freely accessible. PMID 22405085. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.02.015. 
  2. ^ Altshuler, D. (2012). "2011 Curt Stern Award Address". The American Journal of Human Genetics. 90 (3): 407–409. PMC 3309200Freely accessible. PMID 22405086. doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.02.017. 
  3. ^ "David Altshuler, M.D., Ph.D., Joins Vertex as Executive Vice President of Global Research and Chief Scientific Officer". Vertex. Retrieved 30 March 2015. 
  4. ^ "David Altshuler | Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard". Archived from the original on 2012-03-15. 
  5. ^ David Altshuler's publications indexed by the Scopus bibliographic database, a service provided by Elsevier. (subscription required)
  6. ^ Altshuler, D; Hirschhorn, J. N.; Klannemark, M; Lindgren, C. M.; Vohl, M. C.; Nemesh, J; Lane, C. R.; Schaffner, S. F.; Bolk, S; Brewer, C; Tuomi, T; Gaudet, D; Hudson, T. J.; Daly, M; Groop, L; Lander, E. S. (2000). "The common PPARgamma Pro12Ala polymorphism is associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes". Nature Genetics. 26 (1): 76–80. PMID 10973253. doi:10.1038/79216. 
  7. ^ "David Altshuler '86 | MIT Alumni Association's Infinite Connection". Archived from the original on 2012-03-15. 
  8. ^ "David Altshuler, M.D., Ph.D. | HMS Department of Genetics". Archived from the original on 2012-03-15. 
  9. ^ Altshuler, D.; Daly, M. J.; Lander, E. S. (2008). "Genetic Mapping in Human Disease". Science. 322 (5903): 881–888. PMC 2694957Freely accessible. PMID 18988837. doi:10.1126/science.1156409. 
  10. ^ Mootha, V. K.; Lindgren, C. M.; Eriksson, K. F.; Subramanian, A.; Sihag, S.; Lehar, J.; Puigserver, P.; Carlsson, E.; Ridderstråle, M.; Laurila, E.; Houstis, N.; Daly, M. J.; Patterson, N.; Mesirov, J. P.; Golub, T. R.; Tamayo, P.; Spiegelman, B.; Lander, E. S.; Hirschhorn, J. N.; Altshuler, D.; Groop, L. C. (2003). "PGC-1α-responsive genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation are coordinately downregulated in human diabetes". Nature Genetics. 34 (3): 267–273. PMID 12808457. doi:10.1038/ng1180. 
  11. ^ Lander, E. S.; Altshuler, M.; Ireland, D.; Sklar, J.; Ardlie, P.; Patil, K.; Shaw, N.; Lane, C. R.; Lim, E. P.; Kalyanaraman, N.; Nemesh, J.; Ziaugra, L.; Friedland, L.; Rolfe, A.; Warrington, J.; Lipshutz, R.; Daley, G. Q.; Lander, E. S. (1999). "Characterization of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in coding regions of human genes". Nature Genetics. 22 (3): 231–238. PMID 10391209. doi:10.1038/10290. 
  12. ^ De Bakker, P. I. W.; Yelensky, R.; Pe'Er, I.; Gabriel, S. B.; Daly, M. J.; Altshuler, D. (2005). "Efficiency and power in genetic association studies". Nature Genetics. 37 (11): 1217–1223. PMID 16244653. doi:10.1038/ng1669. 
  13. ^ Gabriel, S. B.; Schaffner, S. F.; Nguyen, H.; Moore, J. M.; Roy, J.; Blumenstiel, B.; Higgins, J.; Defelice, M.; Lochner, A.; Faggart, M.; Liu-Cordero, S. N.; Rotimi, C.; Adeyemo, A.; Cooper, R.; Ward, R.; Lander, E. S.; Daly, M. J.; Altshuler, D. (2002). "The Structure of Haplotype Blocks in the Human Genome". Science. 296 (5576): 2225–2229. PMID 12029063. doi:10.1126/science.1069424. 
  14. ^ -, -; Gibbs, R. A.; Belmont, J. W.; Hardenbol, P.; Willis, T. D.; Yu, F.; Yang, H.; Ch'Ang, L. Y.; Huang, W.; Liu, B.; Shen, Y.; Tam, P. K. H.; Tsui, L. C.; Waye, M. M. Y.; Wong, J. T. F.; Zeng, C.; Zhang, Q.; Chee, M. S.; Galver, L. M.; Kruglyak, S.; Murray, S. S.; Oliphant, A. R.; Montpetit, A.; Hudson, T. J.; Chagnon, F.; Ferretti, V.; Leboeuf, M.; Phillips, M. S.; Verner, A.; Kwok, P. Y. (2003). "The International HapMap Project". Nature. 426 (6968): 789–796. PMID 14685227. doi:10.1038/nature02168. 
  15. ^ Frazer, K. A.; Frazer, D. G.; Ballinger, D. R.; Cox, D. A.; Hinds, L. L.; Stuve, R. A.; Gibbs, J. W.; Belmont, A.; Boudreau, P.; Hardenbol, S. M.; Leal, S.; Pasternak, D. A.; Wheeler, T. D.; Willis, F.; Yu, H.; Yang, C.; Zeng, Y.; Gao, H.; Hu, W.; Hu, C.; Li, W.; Lin, S.; Liu, H.; Pan, X.; Tang, J.; Wang, W.; Wang, J.; Yu, B.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, H. (2007). "A second generation human haplotype map of over 3.1 million SNPs". Nature. 449 (7164): 851–861. PMC 2689609Freely accessible. PMID 17943122. doi:10.1038/nature06258. 
  16. ^ Gabriel, S. B.; Schaffner, S. F.; Nguyen, H.; Moore, J. M.; Roy, J.; Blumenstiel, B.; Higgins, J.; Defelice, M.; Lochner, A.; Faggart, M.; Liu-Cordero, S. N.; Rotimi, C.; Adeyemo, A.; Cooper, R.; Ward, R.; Lander, E. S.; Daly, M. J.; Altshuler, D. (2002). "The Structure of Haplotype Blocks in the Human Genome". Science. 296 (5576): 2225–2229. PMID 12029063. doi:10.1126/science.1069424. 
  17. ^ Sachidanandam, R.; Weissman, D.; Schmidt, S. C.; Kakol, J. M.; Stein, L. D.; Marth, G.; Sherry, S.; Mullikin, J. C.; Mortimore, B. J.; Willey, D. L.; Hunt, S. E.; Cole, C. G.; Coggill, P. C.; Rice, C. M.; Ning, Z.; Rogers, J.; Bentley, D. R.; Kwok, P. Y.; Mardis, E. R.; Yeh, R. T.; Schultz, B.; Cook, L.; Davenport, R.; Dante, M.; Fulton, L.; Hillier, L.; Waterston, R. H.; McPherson, J. D.; Gilman, B.; Schaffner, S. (2001). "A map of human genome sequence variation containing 1.42 million single nucleotide polymorphisms". Nature. 409 (6822): 928–933. PMID 11237013. doi:10.1038/35057149. 
  18. ^ David Altshuler publications in Google Scholar