David Dunbar-Nasmith

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David Dunbar-Nasmith
Born 21 February 1921
Died 15 September 1997
Allegiance  United Kingdom
Service/branch  Royal Navy
Years of service 1939 - 1972
Rank Rear Admiral
Commands held HMS Haydon
HMS Peacock
HMS Moon
HMS Rowena
HMS Enard Bay
HMS Alert
HMS Berwick
Battles/wars World War II
Awards Companion of the Order of the Bath
Distinguished Service Cross
Relations Admiral Sir Martin Dunbar-Nasmith VC (father)

Rear Admiral David Arthur Dunbar-Nasmith CB DSC DL (21 February 1921 – 15 September 1997) was a former Royal Navy officer who became Naval Secretary.

Naval career[edit]

Born the son of Admiral Martin Dunbar-Nasmith VC, Dunbar-Nasmith joined the Royal Navy as a Midshipman in 1939.[1] He served in World War II in the Atlantic and the Mediterranean before being given command of HMS Haydon and then HMS Peacock.[1] After the war he commanded HMS Moon and then HMS Rowena before joining the staff of the Flag Officer, 1st Cruiser Squadron and then commanding HMS Enard Bay.[1] He joined the staff of the Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic in 1952 and was then given command of the frigate HMS Alert in 1954.[1] After that he joined the Headquarters of the Supreme Allied Commander Europe in 1958 and then became Commanding Officer of the frigate HMS Berwick as well as Captain of the 5th Frigate Squadron in 1961.[1]

He was appointed Director of Defence Plans at the Ministry of Defence in 1963, Commander, Amphibious Forces in 1965, Naval Secretary in 1967 and finally Flag Officer, Scotland and Northern Ireland in 1970 before retiring in 1972.[1]

In retirement he became Chairman of the Highlands and Islands Development Board.[2] He was also Gentleman Usher of the Green Rod.[2] He lived at Rothes in Moray.[2]

Family[edit]

He married Elizabeth; they had two daughters and two sons.[2]

References[edit]

Military offices
Preceded by
Gervaise Cooke
Naval Secretary
1967–1970
Succeeded by
Iwan Raikes
Preceded by
Sir Ian McGeoch
Flag Officer, Scotland and Northern Ireland
1970–1972
Succeeded by
Martin Lucey