David Trim

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David Trim

David J.B. Trim is a historian, archivist, and educator whose specialties are in European military history and religious history. Currently, he is the director of Archives, Statistics, and Research at the World Headquarters of Seventh-day Adventists and a professor at the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary at Andrews University.[1]

Background[edit]

Trim was born in Bombay, India, in 1969 to British and Australian parents and raised largely in Sydney, Australia.[2] He was educated in Britain: he graduated cum laude from Newbold College with a BA in History; his PhD in War Studies and History is from King's College, London, part of the University of London.[3]

Career[edit]

Trim taught for ten years at Newbold College and for two years held the Walter C. Utt Chair in History at Pacific Union College. In late 2010 he was appointed Archivist of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and in 2011 became its Director of Research; currently he is additionally professor of Church History at the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary. He has also been a visiting researcher at the Huntington Library, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of Reading in the United Kingdom. Trim has been a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society since 2003.[3]

Scholarship[edit]

Trim is the editor or co-editor of ten volumes, including: The Chivalric Ethos and the Development of Military Professionalism (Brill, 2003), Amphibious Warfare 1000-1700: Commerce, State Formation and European Expansion (Brill, 2006), European Warfare 1350-1750 (Cambridge University Press, 2010), Pluralism, Parochialism and Contextualization: Challenges to Adventist Mission in Europe 1864-2004 (Peter Lang, 2010), and Humanitarian Intervention: A History (Cambridge University Press, 2011).[4]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Co-editor, with Benjamin J. Baker, Fundamental Belief 6: Creation. Silver Spring, MD: Office of Archives, Statistics, and Research, 2014.
  • Editor, The Huguenots: History and Memory in Transnational Context. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2011.
  • Co-editor, with Brendan Simms, Humanitarian Intervention—A History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011; South Asian edn, 2011; paperback edn, 2013.
  • Co-editor, with Frank Tallett, European Warfare, 1350–1750. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.
  • Co-editor, with Daniel Heinz, Pluralism, Parochialism and Contextualization: Challenges to Adventist Mission in Europe. Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Brussels, Frankfurt am Main, New York & Vienna: Peter Lang, 2010.
  • Co-editor, with Richard Bonney, The Development of Pluralism in Modern Britain and France. Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Brussels, Frankfurt am Main, New York & Vienna: Peter Lang, 2007.
  • Co-editor, with Richard Bonney, Persecution and Pluralism: Calvinists and Religious Minorities in Early-Modern Europe, 1550-1700. Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Brussels, Frankfurt am Main, New York & Vienna: Peter Lang, 2006.
  • Co-editor, with Mark Charles Fissel, Amphibious Warfare 1000-1700: Commerce, State Formation and European Expansion. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2006; paperback edn, 2011.
  • Co-editor, with Peter J. Balderstone, Cross, Crown and Community: Religion, Government and Culture in Early Modern England, 1400–1800. Oxford, Bern & New York: Peter Lang, 2004.
  • Editor, The Chivalric Ethos and the Development of Military Professionalism. Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2003.

Editorships[edit]

  • Founder and co-editor, monograph series "Warfare, Society and Culture," Pickering & Chatto, Aug. 2007–present.
  • Associate Editor, Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research (founded 1921) Jan. 2002–2010.
  • General Editor, Centre for the Study of Religious and Cultural Diversity, 2004–2008.
  • Consultant Associate Editor, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004), for "Tudor army."

References[edit]

External links[edit]