Deadly Hands of Kung Fu

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The Deadly Hands of Kung Fu
Deadly hands of kung fu 1975.jpg
Editor Various
Categories Martial Arts
Frequency Monthly
First issue 1974
Final issue
— Number
1977
33
Company Magazine Management Company[1]
Country United States
Website N/A

Deadly Hands of Kung Fu is a martial arts comic book magazine published by Magazine Management Company,[1] a corporate sibling of Marvel Comics. There were a total of 33 issues published, plus one "Special Album Edition," before the series was cancelled.

Overview[edit]

This magazine was published in the mid-to-late 1970s amidst the "Kung Fu" or "Chopsocky" movie craze. Bruce Lee movies were scoring huge box-office grosses, and the Kung-Fu television series was being watched by millions. Billy Jack the half-Indian, Green Beret martial arts hero was making his appearance, and people were "shaking their booty" to Carl Douglas's hit "Kung Fu Fighting". Kung-Fu was on many people's lips and the Deadly Hands of Kung Fu was there to capitalize on it. The Deadly Hands of Kung-Fu magazine was launched in 1974 and ended 33 issues later in 1977. Some of the core recurring characters of the magazine were:

Each issue had various comic stories from the above mentioned characters, both single issues stories and multi-issue arcs. Most of the issues had some kind of martial arts movie review from a recently released film. Other issues had interviews with authentic Martial arts instructors, while others had interviews with movie or television celebrities related to martial arts.

The early issues had a martial arts instructional section which described some elementary fighting techniques. These were provided by comics illustrator/martial artist Frank McLaughlin. The magazine was strictly black-and-white with no color except for the cover. The cost of the magazine was 75 cents for issues #1–14. Issue #15 was a "Super Annual" (all reprints) issue and cost $1.25. Issues #16–33 were $1.00, as well as the "Special Album Edition" (June) 1974.[2]

Issue #28, September 1976, was an all Bruce Lee special, including a 35 page comic-format biography, written by Martin Sands, and drawn by Joe Staton and Tony DeZuniga.

When the magazine's run reached the mid-70s, the editors began experimenting by setting some of the comic stories in feudal Japan and starring samurai-type characters, including a four-part story arc called "Sword Quest". The Sons of the Tiger/White Tiger feature ran until the penultimate issue.[3] By 1977 the "Chop-socky" movie craze was beginning to lose steam, which no doubt contributed to the poor sales of the magazine and its cancellation as of its 33rd issue.

Editors[edit]

The magazine had various editors throughout its run; below is each editor and the issues he oversaw:[3]

The Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu[edit]

MMC also published one issue of an offshoot magazine, The Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu, in 1975 . Its single issue did not contain any comic book elements, but featured a lengthy article reprinted from Deadly Hands as well as instructional features by Frank McLaughlin. Editor John Warner explained that The Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu was a trial balloon for an all-articles companion to Deadly Hands. [4]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Deadly Hands of Kung Fu Special #1 at CMRO
  2. ^ a b Deadly Hands of Kung Fu at the Grand Comics Database
  3. ^ Warner, John (June 1975). "Editorial". Deadliest Heroes of Kung Fu (Magazine Management Company) 1 (1): 2. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]