Desperado (roller coaster)

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Desperado
Primm (8).jpg
Primm Valley Resorts
Park sectionOld Western Times
Coordinates35°36′51″N 115°23′04″W / 35.61417°N 115.38444°W / 35.61417; -115.38444Coordinates: 35°36′51″N 115°23′04″W / 35.61417°N 115.38444°W / 35.61417; -115.38444
StatusOperating
Opening dateAugust 11, 1994 (1994-08-11)[1]
Cost$30,000,000
General statistics
TypeSteel – Hypercoaster
ManufacturerArrow Dynamics
DesignerRon Toomer
ModelHypercoaster
Track layoutRon Toomer
Lift/launch systemChain
Height209 ft (64 m)
Drop225 ft (69 m)
Length5,843 ft (1,781 m)
Speed80 mph (130 km/h)
Inversions0
Duration2:43
Max vertical angle60°
Capacity900 riders per hour
G-force4
Height restriction52 in (132 cm)
Trains3 trains with 5 cars. Riders are arranged 2 across in 3 rows for a total of 30 riders per train.
Desperado at RCDB
Pictures of Desperado at RCDB

Desperado is a hypercoaster located in Primm, Nevada, United States at the Buffalo Bill's Hotel and Casino a part of the Primm Valley Resorts complex.

According to the roller coaster database, Desperado was the tallest roller coasters in the world when it opened. It features a 60-degree, 225-foot (69 m) drop; a 209-foot (64 m) lift hill; and top speeds around 80 mph. On the 2 minute, 43 second ride, riders will experience almost 4 g.[2] A portion of the ride runs through the interior of the casino. The coaster was listed by the Guinness Book of Records as the world's tallest roller coaster in 1996.[3] The ride was provided by Arrow Dynamics and fabricated by Intermountain Lift, Inc.[4]

History[edit]

Looking to attract people driving by on adjacent Interstate 15 to his new casino, Buffalo Bill's, which opened on May 14, 1994, Gary Primm contracted Arrow Dynamics to build a highly visible roller coaster. The roller coaster opened to the public on August 11, 1994, the tallest and fastest roller coasters in the world. The ride's 209-foot-tall (64 m) lift hill. Its drop length of 225 feet (69 m) and top speed of 80 mph (130 km/h) were tied in the country with Kennywood's Steel Phantom, which also featured a 225-foot (69 m) drop and top speed of 80 mph (130 km/h). The Guinness Book of World Records recognized Desperado in its 1996 publication as the tallest roller coaster in the world.[3]

For his Top Secret special that first aired on February 24, 1999, magician Lance Burton staged a death-defying escape in a stunt where he was tied to the roller coaster's track and had to break out of handcuffs in order to escape.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palermo, Dave (August 7, 1994). "PRIMM SPRUCING UP CALIFORNIA-NEVADA BORDER". Las Vegas Review-Journal/Sun.
  2. ^ Marden, Duane. " (Primm Valley Resorts)". Roller Coaster DataBase.
  3. ^ a b "Desperado Roller Coaster Fact Sheet". Primm Valley Casino Resorts. August 13, 2001. Archived from the original on March 24, 2006. Retrieved 2007-03-13.
  4. ^ "Amusement". Intermountain Lift, Inc. July 30, 2011. Archived from the original on November 8, 2014. Retrieved September 5, 2014.
  5. ^ "Lance Burton's Escape On The Desperado To Air Next Wednesday". Retrieved 2007-04-18.

External links[edit]