Dichloroisocyanuric acid

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Dichloroisocyanuric acid
Dichlor
Dichlor
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
1,3-Dichloro-1,3,5-triazinane-2,4,6-trione
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.018.625 Edit this at Wikidata
KEGG
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C3HCl2N3O3/c4-7-1(9)6-2(10)8(5)3(7)11/h(H,6,9,10) checkY
    Key: CEJLBZWIKQJOAT-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/C3HCl2N3O3/c4-7-1(9)6-2(10)8(5)3(7)11/h(H,6,9,10)
    Key: CEJLBZWIKQJOAT-UHFFFAOYAN
  • C1(=O)NC(=O)N(C(=O)N1Cl)Cl
  • ClN1C(=O)NC(=O)N(Cl)C1=O
Properties
C3HCl2N3O3
Molar mass 197.96 g/mol
Density 2.2 g/cm3
Melting point 225 °C (437 °F; 498 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
checkY verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

Dichloroisocyanuric acid, also known as dichlor or dichloro-s-triazinetrione and is marketed under many names (e.g. troclosene), is a chemical compound with the formula (C(O)NCl)2(C(O)NH).

Synthesis[edit]

Dichloroisocyanuric acid is manufactured by chlorination of cyanuric acid:[1]

(C(O)NH)3 + 2 Cl2 → (C(O)NCl)2(C(O)NH) + 2 HCl

It is a colourless solid.[2]

Mechanism of action[edit]

Dichloroisocyanuric acid is an oxidizer, reacting with water to form chlorine gas.[2]

Although the bleaching agent in most chlorine based bleach is sodium hypochlorite, the sodium salt of dichloroisocyanuric acid, sodium dichloroisocyanurate, is the active ingredient in commercial disinfectant bacteriocides, algicides, and cleaning agents.[3], for example the pulverized cleanser Comet.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Huthmacher, K.; Most, D. "Cyanuric Acid and Cyanuric Chloride". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a08_191.
  2. ^ a b "Pubchem Dichloroisocyanuric acid". Apr 17, 2021.
  3. ^ "Alfa Aesar™ Dichloroisocyanuric acid sodium salt, 97% (dry wt.), water <3%". Retrieved April 22, 2021.
  4. ^ "Procter&Gamble MSDS Comet Powder" (PDF). Oct 15, 2013.