Dixon Pitcher

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Dixon Pitcher
Member of the Utah House of Representatives
from the 10th[1] district
Assumed office
January 1, 2011
Preceded by Brent Wallis
Member of the Utah House of Representatives
from the 8th district
In office
January 1, 1985 – December 31, 1986
Preceded by Marvin Heslop
Succeeded by Haynes Fuller
Personal details
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Residence Ogden, Utah
Alma mater Weber State College
Utah State University

Dixon M. Pitcher[2] is an American politician and a Republican member of the Utah House of Representatives representing District 10 since January 1, 2011. Pitcher was non-consecutively a Representative from January 1, 1985 until December 31, 1986 in the District 8 seat. Dixon lives in Ogden, UT, with his wife, Darlene, and their six children.[3]

Education[edit]

Pitcher earned his BA from Weber State College (now Weber State University) and his MA in political science from Utah State University.

Political career[edit]

Dixon Pitcher was elected on November 2, 2010.[3] He previously served in the Utah State House of Representatives from 1984-1986. During the 2016 Legislative Session, Dixon served on the Business, Economic Development, and Labor Appropriations Subcommittee, the House Business and Labor Committee, and the House Political Subdivisions Committee.[4] Mr. Pitcher announced that he will not seek re-election [5]

2016 sponsored bills[edit]

Bill number Bill title Status
HB214S02 Protective 0rder Modifications House/ filed – 3/10/2016
HB0368 Short-term Rental Tax Amendments House/ filed – 3/10/2016
HB0468 Public Utility Regulatory Restricted Account Amendments House/ filed – 3/10/2016

[6]

Pitcher passed none of the three bills he introduced. Pitcher also floor sponsored SB0004S01 Business, Economic Development, and Labor Base Budget and SB0133S02 Small Employment Retirement Amendments.

Elections[edit]

  • 2014: Pitcher was unopposed in the Republican convention and ran against Democrat Eric Irvine in the General election. Pitcher won with 3,116 votes (57%) to Irvine's 2,355 votes (43%).[7]
  • 2012: Pitcher was unopposed for the June 26, 2012 Republican Primary[7] and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 5,558 votes (54.3%) against Democratic nominee Christopher Winn.[8]
  • 2010: When District 10 incumbent Republican Representative Brent Wallis left the Legislature and left the seat open, Pitcher was unopposed for the May 8, 2010 Republican convention[9] and won the November 2, 2010 General election with 4,229 votes (54.3%) against Democratic nominee Randy Rounds.[10]
  • 1986: Pitcher was unopposed for the 1986 Republican Primary[11] but lost the three-way November 4, 1986 General election to Democratic nominee Haynes Fuller.[12]
  • 1984: To challenge District 8 incumbent Democratic Representative Marvin Heslop, Pitcher won the 1984 Republican Primary with 1,062 votes (53.9%)[13] and won the November 6, 1984 General election with 4,540 votes (52.5%) against Representative Heslop.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dixon M. Pitcher (R)". Salt Lake City, Utah: Utah State Legislature. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Dixon Pitcher's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Dixon Pitcher". Philipsburg, MT: Project Vote Smart. Retrieved April 10, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Committees". le.utah.gov. Retrieved 2016-03-30. 
  5. ^ "Utah Rep. Dixon Pitcher won't seek re-election". Retrieved 2018-02-15. 
  6. ^ "2016 – Legislation(House Of Representatives)". le.utah.gov. Retrieved 2016-03-30. 
  7. ^ a b "2014 General Canvass Reports". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved March 30, 2016. 
  8. ^ "2012 General Canvass Report". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  9. ^ "2010 Primary Election Results". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  10. ^ "2010 General Election Results". Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  11. ^ "State of Utah Primary Election Report 1986" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  12. ^ "State of Utah General Election Report November 4, 1986" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. p. 7. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  13. ^ "State of Utah Primary Election Report 1984" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. p. 3. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 
  14. ^ "State of Utah General Election Report November 6, 1984" (PDF). Salt Lake City, Utah: Lieutenant Governor of Utah. p. 10. Retrieved February 3, 2014. 

External links[edit]