Doc O'Lena

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Doc O'Lena
Breed Quarter Horse
Discipline Cutting
Sire Doc Bar
Grandsire Lightning Bar
Dam Poco Lena
Maternal grandsire Poco Bueno
Sex Stallion
Foaled 1967
Country United States
Color Bay
Breeder Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Jensen
Owner Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Jensen
Other awards
1970 NCHA Futurity Champion
Honors
American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame

Doc O'Lena (1967-1993) was a Quarter Horse stallion, a champion cutting horse and a sire of champion cutting horses.[1] He was inducted into both the AQHA and NCHA Halls of Fame, as was his dam Poco Lena.[2] He was the 1970 NCHA Futurity Open Champion, followed by his full brother, Dry Doc, who won the title in 1971. As a sire, Doc O'Lena earned recognition as the first futurity champion to sire a futurity champion when Lenaette won the title in 1975. He also sired Smart Little Lena, the first horse to win the NCHA Triple Crown.

Background[edit]

Doc O'Lena was foaled in 1967, sired by Doc Bar and out of the mare Poco Lena.[3] He is one of only two horses in the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame with both parents also inductees; the other is Easy Jet. His color was bay, and his only markings were a small star on his head, and a small white half pastern on his left hind foot.[4][5] He was bred and owned by Dr. and Mrs. Stephen F. Jensen of Paicines, California at the time of registration.

The Jensens had hoped to sell Doc O'Lena as a yearling to cutting horse trainer, Don Dodge. Dodge had purchased Doc O'Lena's dam in 1953 from E. Paul Waggoner’s Three D Stock Farm in Arlinton, TX., and had successfully shown her to win numerous AQHA and NCHA awards and titles. After seeing Doc O'Lena, Dodge concluded that he was too small to be a cutting horse, and passed on the offer. The Jensens decided to keep Doc O'Lena and get him into the hands of a professional trainer. They contacted Shorty Freeman who, in 1968, was hauling for the NCHA World Championship title showing King Skeet for Adrian Berryhill. On his way to the San Francisco Cow Palace, Freeman stopped by the Jensen's to look at Doc O'Lena. Freeman wasn't concerned about the yearling's small size, and agreed to take him for training.[6]

During an interview, Freeman recalled the first time he tried to ride Doc O'Lena as a green broke, long yearling and the colt ran off with him.[6] He said, "I didn't think running off belonged to him, so that didn't really bother me." Referencing Poco Lena he said, "Besides, I knew what the old mare was, so I wanted to ride him." He also said, "I didn't train Doc O'Lena anyway, he trained himself. I knew about 30 days after I got him that he was an exceptional horse... I always had to ride him last in the training program, 'cause if I didn't, I'd be mad at all the other horses in the barn. He was just that good."[4][6]

In April 1970, Adrian Berryhill partnered with Freeman and they purchased Doc O'Lena from the Jensens for $15,000. In December that same year, Freeman rode Doc O'Lena to win the NCHA Futurity, and "became the first competitors to make a clean sweep of the futurity’s preliminary go-rounds, semi-finals and finals",[2] winning $17,357 for his new owners.[4] Doc O'Lena's NCHA lifetime earnings totaled $21,991.93, and he had also earned an NCHA Certificate of Ability.[7]

Doc O’Lena sired 1,310 foals: 321 were AQHA point earners having accumulated 3,978.5 points; 87 earned Registers of Merit in performance events (also 9 amateur, 3 youth); 9 earned Superior performance awards; 4 were world champions; 6 were youth world champions; and 4 were reserve world champions.

Among Doc O'Lena's offspring were Doc Athena, Sugar Olena, Lenas Peppy, Smart Little Lena, and Todaysmyluckyday.[8] His son Montana Doc is a member of the NCHA Hall of Fame.[9] Doc O'Lena was the first NCHA Futurity winner to sire a Futurity winner when Lenaette won the Futurity in 1975. His son Smart Little Lena was the first winner of the NCHA triple crown. And in 1978, Doc O'Lena himself was syndicated for $2.1 million, at that time a record for the cutting horse industry.[4]

Doc O'Lena was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame.[10]

Pedigree[edit]

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Percentage (TB)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Three Bars (TB)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Myrtle Dee (TB)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lightning Bar
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Doc Horn (TB)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Della P
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mare by Old DJ
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Doc Bar
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
My Texas Dandy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Texas Dandy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Streak
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dandy Doll
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bartender II
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bar Maid F
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nelly Bly
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Doc O'Lena
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Zantanon
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
King P-234
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jabalina
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Poco Bueno
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Old Poco Bueno
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Miss Taylor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mare by Hickory Bill
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Poco Lena
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dodger
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pretty Boy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Little Maud
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sheilwin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Blackburn
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
mare by Blackburn
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Waggoner Ranch mare
 
 
 
 
 
 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Thornton, et. al Legends 4 pp. 190–205
  2. ^ a b "Doc O'Lena: Inducted into the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame in 1997". Retrieved March 31, 2017. 
  3. ^ Pedigree of Doc O'Lena at All Breed Pedigree retrieved June 26, 2007
  4. ^ a b c d Groves "Doc O'Lena" Quarter Horse Journal p. 18
  5. ^ American Quarter Horse Association Official Stud Book and Registry Vol. 22 p. 341
  6. ^ a b c Nettles, Gala (1990). Just Shorty. Retrieved March 31, 2017. 
  7. ^ NCHA Earnings for Doc O'Lena retrieved on July 4, 2007
  8. ^ Pitzer The Most Influential Quarter Horse Sires pp. 30–33
  9. ^ National Cutting Horse Association "Hall of Fame"
  10. ^ American Quarter Horse Association "Hall of Fame Archived October 12, 2011, at the Wayback Machine."

References[edit]

  • All Breed Pedigree Database Pedigree of Doc O'Lena retrieved on June 26, 2007
  • American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA). "AQHA Hall of Fame". American Quarter Horse Association. Archived from the original on December 15, 2007. Retrieved November 10, 2010. 
  • American Quarter Horse Association (1968). Official Stud Book and Registry. Volume 22. Amarillo, TX: American Quarter Horse Association. 
  • Larry Thorton; Holmes, Robert L.; Mike Boardman; Diana Ciarloni; Jim Goodhue; Gold, Alan D.; Sally Harrison; Betsy Lynch; AJ Mangum (editors) (2002). Legends 4: Outstanding Quarter Horse Stallions and Mares. Colorado Springs, CO: Western Horseman. ISBN 0-911647-49-X. 
  • Groves, Lesli Krause (October 1994). "Doc O'Lena". Quarter Horse Journal: 18. 
  • NCHA website retrieved on July 4, 2007
  • National Cutting Horse Association. "Hall of Fame". National Cutting Horse Association. Retrieved July 4, 2007. 
  • Pitzer, Andrea Laycock (1987). The Most Influential Quarter Horse Sires. Tacoma, WA: Premier Pedigrees. 

External links[edit]