Donald Luddington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Donald Collin Cumyn Luddington)
Jump to: navigation, search
陸鼎堂爵士
Sir Donald Luddington
Sir Donald Luddington.jpg
22nd High Commissioner for the Western Pacific
In office
10 October 1973 – 2 January 1976
Monarch Elizabeth II
Preceded by Sir Michael Gass
Succeeded by Office Abolished
6th Governor of the Solomon Islands
In office
21 August 1974 – 2 January 1976
Monarch Elizabeth II
Preceded by New Creation
Succeeded by Sir Colin Allan
2nd Commissioner, Independent Commission Against Corruption
In office
4 July 1978 – 10 November 1980
Preceded by Jack Cater
Succeeded by Peter Barry Williams
Personal details
Born (1920-08-18)18 August 1920
Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
Died 26 January 2009(2009-01-26) (aged 88)
Easingwold, Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Spouse(s) Garry Brodie Johnston
Children 1 son, 1 daughter
Alma mater University of St. Andrews

Sir Donald Collin Cumyn Luddington, KBE, CMG, CVO (Chinese: 陸鼎堂爵士, 18 August 1920 – 26 January 2009) was a British colonial government official and civil servant who served firstly in the Hong Kong Government and became District Commissioner, New Territories and the Secretary for Home Affairs successively, during which he had also served as an official member of the Legislative Council. He was later promoted to Oceania and was High Commissioner for the Western Pacific and Governor of the Solomon Islands during the period from 1973 to 1976. He returned to Hong Kong in 1977 to replace Sir Ronald Holmes as chairman of the Public Service Commission. He was the second person, after Sir Jack Cater, to hold the post of Commissioner of ICAC from 1978 until his retirement in 1980.

Biography[edit]

Early years[edit]

Luddington was born on 18 August 1920 in Edinburgh, Scotland.[1] His father, Norman John Luddington, was a civil servant in British Ceylon and his mother was Myrtle Amethyst Payne.[2] He studied at Dover College and then the University of St Andrews, where he obtained a MA degree.[2]

From 1940 to 1946, he served in the British Army and fought in the Second World War. He was initially commissioned as a second lieutenant in the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (KOYLI) on 28 December 1940,[3] and transferred to the Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) on 22 October 1941.[4] He saw action in India and Arakan, Burma amongst others, and was Mentioned in Despatches on 5 April 1945.[2][5][6] By that time he was a lieutenant, he continued to hold his emergency commission until 19 July 1952 when he transferred to the Reserve of Officers, and was granted the honorary rank of captain.[7]

Colonial services[edit]

In February 1949, Luddington arrived at Hong Kong as a cadet and began his career as a colonial official in Hong Kong.[8][9] He was initially sent to Tai Po as a District Officer and in later time served in various government departments including the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, the Hong Kong Police Force, the Colonial Secretariat and the Commerce and Industry Department. Apart from that, he also served in the Royal Hong Kong Regiment from 1949 to 1955.[5] In November 1960, he was appointed Defence Secretary and Principal Assistant Colonial Secretary and was responsible for overseeing the security issues of Hong Kong.[10] He later served successively as Deputy Secretary for Home Affairs and Deputy Director of Commerce and Industry in the mid-1960s and became a member of the Hong Kong Management Association. In April 1969, Luddington replaced Kenneth Strathmore Kinghorn as District Commissioner, New Territories, thus becoming an official member of the Legislative Council appointed by then Governor Sir David Trench under the approval from the Queen.[11] In June that year he was further appointed as an official Justice of the Peace.

In May 1971, Luddington succeeded (later Sir) Ronald Holmes as the Secretary for Home Affairs and became a principal government official.[12] However, as Rafael Hui, a former junior colleague to Luddington recalled, he was too upright, and therefore, was not on very good terms with the diplomat-turned new Governor, Sir Murray MacLehose.[13] It was said that in one occasion MacLehose had ordered something for Luddington's subordinates to follow-up. Nevertheless, Luddington deemed the diplomatic-like orders were nonsense and dismissed all of them. As a result, in May 1973, he was "promoted" to Oceania by the Governor. He was appointed High Commissioner for the Western Pacific on 10 October 1973 and his major duty was to administer a small and remote British colony, the British Solomon Islands.[13][14] Yet, to let Luddington leave Hong Kong with dignity, he was appointed Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George before being appointed as High Commissioner.[15] On 21 August 1974, he was further appointed as Governor of the British Solomon Islands Protectorate and he continued to serve this position until January 1976. After that the position of High Commissioner for the Western Pacific was abolished and thus he was the last person to hold this post.[16][17][18][19]

During his term as Governor, he entertained the Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip in their royal visit to the Solomon Islands in February 1974. He was subsequently appointed Commander of the Royal Victorian Order for his hospitality to the Queen.[20][21] Furthermore, under his supervision, a new constitution was adopted in 1974 establishing a parliamentary democracy and ministerial system of government for the colony. In mid-1975, the name "Solomon Islands" officially replaced that of "British Solomon Islands Protectorate" which paved way for the colony to self-government and independence. Luddington left the governorship in January 1976 and self-government was established immediately. Two years later, the Solomon Islands gained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth realm. Luddington was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen's Birthday Honours in June 1976 for his services to Oceania.[22]

In May 1977, Sir Donald returned to Hong Kong to succeed Sir Ronald Holmes as chairman of the Public Service Commission.[23] He left the post in March 1978 but was appointed to replace Jack Cater as the second Commissioner of ICAC by Governor MacLehose on 4 July in the same year. During his term as the Commissioner, he strived to improve the stained relationship between the ICAC and the Royal Hong Kong Police Force and helped ICAC build up its public image as a public body devoted to anti-corruption. He finally retired from the government in November 1980.[2][24][25]

Later years[edit]

Luddington spent his later years in retirement in Easingwold, Yorkshire. He died in a hospital in Harrogate on 26 January 2009 at the age of 88. Under the arrangement of his family members, his funeral took place in the Easingwold Parish Church at 11:00 on 2 February.[26] By the time of his death, he was the last surviving former High Commissioner for the Western Pacific.[17] After his death, both the then Chief Executive of Hong Kong Donald Tsang and then ICAC Commissioner Timothy Tong sent their condolences to the family of Luddington. They praised his contribution to Hong Kong while Luddington was described by Tsang as "a long-time friend" of him.[24][27]

Family[edit]

Luddington was married to Garry Brodie Johnston, daughter of Alexander Buchanan Johnston, in 1945. The couple had one son and one daughter.[2] Lady Luddington once served as the Vice President of the Hong Kong Girl Guides Association.[28] She died on 4 November 2002. Sir Donald's hobbies included reading and walking. He was a member of the Royal Commonwealth Society and the Hong Kong Club.[2]

On 7 November 1980, Lady Luddington laid the foundation stone of the Hong Kong Girl Guides Association's new headquarters in Gascoigne Road, Kowloon.

Honours[edit]

Conferment[edit]

Titles[edit]

  • Donald Luddington (18 August 1920 – April 1969)
  • The Honourable Donald Luddington (April 1969 – June 1969)
  • The Honourable Donald Luddington, JP (June 1969 – April 1971)
  • Donald Luddington, JP (April 1971 – May 1971)
  • The Honourable Donald Luddington, JP (May 1971 – May 1973)
  • Donald Luddington (May 1973 – 2 June 1973)
  • Donald Luddington, CMG (2 June 1973 – 21 February 1974)
  • Donald Luddington, CMG, CVO (21 February 1974 – 12 June 1976)
  • Sir Donald Luddington, KBE, CMG, CVO (12 June 1976 – 26 January 2009)

See also[edit]

Major experience
  • District Commissioner, New Territories
    (April 1969 – April 1971)
  • Official Member of the Legislative Council
    (April 1969 – April 1971)
  • Secretary for Home Affairs
    (May 1971 – May 1973)
  • Official Member of the Urban Council
    (1971 – 1973)
  • Official Member of the Legislative Council
    (May 1971 – May 1973)
  • High Commissioner for the Western Pacific
    (October 1973 – January 1976)
  • Governor of the British Solomon Islands Protectorate
    (August 1974 – 1975)
  • Governor of the Solomon Islands
    (1975 – January 1976)
  • Chairman of the Public Service Commission
    (May 1977 – March 1978)
  • Commissioner of ICAC
    (July 1978 – November 1980)

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Index Lo-Ly", rulers.org, retrieved on 5 February 2009.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Who's Who, London: A & C Black, 2008.
  3. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 35056. pp. 547–550. 24 January 1941. Retrieved 2009-02-06.
  4. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 35740. pp. 4431–4432. 9 October 1942. Retrieved 2009-02-06.
  5. ^ a b 〈薜畿輔接長警務處〉,《工商日報》第四頁,1968年12月13日。
  6. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 37015. p. 1810. 3 April 1945. Retrieved 2009-02-06.
  7. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 39600. p. 3869. 15 July 1952. Retrieved 2009-02-06.
  8. ^ Edited by Kevin Sinclair, Who's Who in Hong Kong, Hong Kong: SCMP, 1979.
  9. ^ 〈姬達獲委任布政司〉,《工商日報》第八頁,1978年7月1日。
  10. ^ 〈景韓任市政局長〉,《工商日報》第五頁,1960年11月26日。
  11. ^ The London Gazette: no. 44840. p. 4658. 2 May 1969. Retrieved 2009-02-06.
  12. ^ 〈黎敦義繼陸鼎堂任新界民政署長〉,《工商日報》第二十頁,1971年4月1日。
  13. ^ a b 重原則 有性格 佩服兩「恐龍師父」〉,香港《文匯報》,2005年11月4日。
  14. ^ The London Gazette: no. 46117. p. 12971. 1 November 1973. Retrieved 2008-02-06.
  15. ^ a b The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 45984. p. 6476. 22 May 1973. Retrieved 2009-02-06.
  16. ^ "British Western Pacific Territories", World Statesmen.org, retrieved on 5 February 2009.
  17. ^ a b "Solomon Islands", World Statesmen.org, retrieved on 5 February 2009.
  18. ^ "Former ICAC chief dies in Britain", South China Morning Post CITY3, 4 February 2009.
  19. ^ The London Gazette: no. 46357. p. 8114. 1 October 1974. Retrieved 2009-02-06.
  20. ^ a b The London Gazette: no. 46280. p. 5486. 3 May 1974. Retrieved 2009-02-06.
  21. ^ "South Pacific realms", The Monarchy Today, retrieved on 5 February 2009.
  22. ^ a b The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 46919. p. 8031. 4 June 1976. Retrieved 2009-02-06.
  23. ^ 公務員敘用委員會二零零零年年報》,香港:香港政府,2000年。
  24. ^ a b 前廉政專員陸鼎堂逝世〉,《蘋果日報》,2009年2月4日。
  25. ^ 歷任廉政專員〉,《凝聚群力,共建廉政》,香港:廉政公署,2004年。
  26. ^ "Donald Luddington : Obituary", Yorkshire Post, 29 January 2009.
  27. ^ 行政長官對陸鼎堂爵士逝世深切哀悼〉,《新聞公報》,香港:香港政府,2009年2月3日。
  28. ^ 女童軍歷史〉,《香港女童軍總會》網頁,造訪於2009年2月5日。

References[edit]

English materials[edit]

  • Edited by Kevin Sinclair, Who's Who in Hong Kong, Hong Kong: SCMP, 1979.
  • Who's Who, London: A & C Black, 2008.
  • "Donald Luddington: Obituary", Yorkshire Post, 29 January 2009.
  • "Former ICAC chief dies in Britain", South China Morning Post CITY3, 4 February 2009.
  • "British Western Pacific Territories", World Statesmen.org, retrieved on 5 February 2009.
  • "Index Lo-Ly", rulers.org, retrieved on 5 February 2009.
  • "Solomon Islands", World Statesmen.org, retrieved on 5 February 2009.
  • "South Pacific realms", The Monarchy Today, retrieved on 5 February 2009.

Chinese materials[edit]

  • 〈景韓任市政局長〉,《工商日報》第五頁,1960年11月26日。
  • 〈薜畿輔接長警務處〉,《工商日報》第四頁,1968年12月13日。
  • 〈黎敦義繼陸鼎堂任新界民政署長〉,《工商日報》第二十頁,1971年4月1日。
  • 〈姬達獲委任布政司〉,《工商日報》第八頁,1978年7月1日。
  • 《公務員敘用委員會二零零零年年報》,香港:香港政府,2000年。
  • 〈歷任廉政專員〉,《凝聚群力,共建廉政》,香港:廉政公署,2004年。
  • 〈重原則 有性格 佩服兩「恐龍師父」〉,香港《文匯報》,2005年11月4日。
  • 〈行政長官對陸鼎堂爵士逝世深切哀悼〉,《新聞公報》,香港:香港政府,2009年2月3日。
  • 〈前廉政專員陸鼎堂逝世〉,《蘋果日報》,2009年2月4日。
  • 〈女童軍歷史〉,《香港女童軍總會》網頁,造訪於2009年2月5日。

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Kenneth Stratmore Kinghorn
District Commissioner, New Territories
April 1969 - April 1971
Succeeded by
Denis Bray
Preceded by
Ronald Holmes
Secretary for Home Affairs
May 1971 - May 1973
Succeeded by
Jack Cater
Preceded by
Sir Michael Gass
High Commissioner for the Western Pacific
October 1973 - January 1976
Succeeded by
Office Abolished
Preceded by
New Creation
Governor of the British Solomon Islands Protectorate
renamed Governor of the Solomon Islands in 1975
August 1974 - January 1976
Succeeded by
Colin Allan
Preceded by
Sir Ronald Holmes
Chairman of the Public Service Commission
May 1977 - March 1978
Succeeded by
Ian MacDonald Lightbody
Civic offices
Preceded by
Jack Cater
Commissioner, Independent Commission Against Corruption
1978 – 1980
Succeeded by
Peter Barry Williams