Echinodorus subalatus

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Echinodorus subalatus
Echinodorus subalatus.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
Order: Alismatales
Family: Alismataceae
Genus: Echinodorus
Species: E. subalatus
Binomial name
Echinodorus subalatus
(Mart.) Griseb.
Synonyms[1]
  • Alisma subalatum Mart. ex Schult.f. in J.J.Roemer & J.A.Schultes
  • Sagittaria palifolia var. subalata (Mart. ex Schult.f.) Kuntze
  • Alisma intermedium Mart. ex Schult.f. in J.J.Roemer & J.A.Schultes
  • Alisma subalatum var. majus Schult.f. in J.J.Roemer & J.A.Schultes
  • Alisma subalatum var. medium Schult.f. in J.J.Roemer & J.A.Schultes
  • Alisma subalatum var. minus Schult.f. in J.J.Roemer & J.A.Schultes
  • Echinodorus intermedius (Mart. ex Schult.f.) Griseb
  • Echinodorus ellipticus var. ovatus Micheli in A.L.P.de Candolle & A.C.P.de Candolle
  • Echinodorus martii Micheli in A.L.P.de Candolle & A.C.P.de Candolle
  • Echinodorus longistylus Buchenau in H.G.A.Engler
  • Echinodorus andrieuxii (Hook. & Arn.) Small in N.L.Britton & al.
  • Echinodorus subalatus var. minor F.J.Mey.
  • Echinodorus andrieuxii var. longistylus (Buchenau) Rataj
  • Echinodorus subalatus subsp. andrieuxii (Hook. & Arn.) R.R.Haynes & Holm-Niels.


Echinodorus subalatus is a species of aquatic plants in the Alismataceae. It is native to Cuba, Mexico, Central America, Guyana, Venezuela, Bolivia, Brazil and Paraguay.[1] It is found naturally growing in mud by the side of streams.

Description[edit]

Leaves with canaliculate petioles, blades lanceolate, narrowly to broadly ovate, sharp on the tip, decumbent or rarely abrupt on the base, 18 – 24 cm long x 2 – 9 cm wide, with terrestrial forms usually only 10 x 2 cm having 5 - 7 veins and distinct pellucid lines.

Stem below cylindrical, between whorls triangular in cross-section, often alate, 35 – 120 cm long. Inflorescence racemose or paniculate having 4 - 15 whorls. Bracts on base connate, longer than the pedicels (up to 3.5 cm). Pedicels 0.5 – 2 cm long. Sepals 4 – 6 mm long, petals about twice as long, the diameter of the corolla 1.2 - 1.5 cm. Usually 12 stamens, achenes 2 x 1.5 mm with one, rarely 2 glands separated by a rib. Stylar beak bent back - reaching usually 1/4 of the body.[2][3][4][5][6][7]

Vegetatively, resembles E. andrieuxii, nut differs by having distinct pellucid lines, a usually paniculate inflorescence and by achenes with beaks that are at most 1/3 as long as the body.

Cultivation[edit]

Deep, rich growing substrate and a good light. Will grow submersed or emersed. Benefits from additional CO2.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "World Checklist of Selected Plant Families: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew". apps.kew.org. Retrieved 2017-01-28. 
  2. ^ A., Grisebach, (1866-01-01). "Catalogus plantarum cubensium exhibens collectionem Wrightianam aliasque minores ex insula Cuba missas". 
  3. ^ von,, Linné, Carl; J., Römer, J.; August,, Schultes, Joseph; Hermann,, Schultes, Julius; Joachim,, Sprengel, Kurt Polycarp; G., Cotta, J. (1830-01-01). "Caroli a Linné ... Systema vegetabilium :". v.7, pt.2. 
  4. ^ CONABIO. 2009. Catálogo taxonómico de especies de México. 1. In Capital Nat. México. CONABIO, Mexico City.
  5. ^ CROW, G. E. 2003. Alismataceae. In: Manual de Plantas de Costa Rica, B.E. Hammel, M.H. Grayum, C. Herrera & N. Zamora (eds.). Monographs in systematic botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden92: 35–42.
  6. ^ Davidse, G., M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater. 1994. Alismataceae a Cyperaceae. 6: i–xvi, 1–543. In G. Davidse, M. Sousa Sánchez & A.O. Chater (eds.) Flora Mesoamericana. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, D. F.
  7. ^ Haynes, R. R. & L.B. Holm-Nielsen. 1994. The Alismataceae. Flora Neotropica 64: 1–112.
  8. ^ K. Rataj in Petfish Monthly, December 1976.

External links[edit]