Edward Crundall

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Edward Duncan Crundall
Born (1896-12-09)9 December 1896
Whitfield, Kent, England
Died 1980s
Allegiance United Kingdom
Service/branch Royal Navy
Royal Air Force
Years of service 1914–1919
1935–1954
Rank Wing Commander
Unit No. 8 Squadron RNAS
No. 210 Squadron RAF
Commands held No. 116 (Calibration) Squadron RAF
Battles/wars World War I
World War II
Awards Distinguished Flying Cross
Air Force Cross

Wing Commander Edward Duncan Crundall DFC, AFC (9 December 1896 – 1980s) was an officer of the British Royal Air Force, who served in World War I, becoming flying ace credited with seven aerial victories, and also in World War II.

Biography[edit]

Edward Duncan Crundall was born in Whitfield, Kent, England on 9 December 1896.[1] He was the son of Edward Crundall (1852-1942), a wealthy coal dealer of Kent, and Sarah Crundall, née Morley. Edward's grandfather, Henry Crundall (1821-1894), was an uncle of Sir William Henry Crundall (1847-1934), a mayor of Dover, Kent, and Chairman of the Dover Harbour Board. Edward Duncan's younger brother, Walter Frederick (1899-1982), also flew during World War 1. Edward Duncan Crundall died in 1981 in Brighton, E. Sussex.

World War I[edit]

Crundall joined the Royal Naval Air Service in 1914.[1] He was appointed a temporary flight sub-lieutenant on 20 July 1916.[2] On 5 September 1916 he was granted the Royal Aero Club Aviator's Certificate No. 3543 at Royal Naval Air Station Eastbourne,[1] and was posted to No. 8 Naval Squadron as a pilot. He would score his first aerial victories during Bloody April 1917 while flying a Sopwith Triplane. On 10 May 1917, he was wounded and shot down by Alois Heldmann.

Crundall was promoted to flight lieutenant on 31 December 1917,[3] and on 10 May 1918 he was appointed acting-captain.[4] He then switched squadrons and mounts for his last four wins in July and August 1918, flying a Sopwith Camel for 210 Squadron RAF.[5] He was confirmed in his rank in December 1918.[6]

Crundall relinquished his commission on 28 August 1919,[7] and on 10 October "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war", was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.[8]

List of aerial victories[1][9]
No. Date/time Aircraft Foe Result Location Notes
1 14 April 1917
@ 0905 hours
Sopwith Triplane
Serial Number N5464
Albatros reconnaissance plane Driven down out of control Henin-Liétard
2 14 April 1917
@ 0905 hours
Albatros reconnaissance plane Driven down out of control
3 18 August 1917
@ 1830 hours
Albatros D.V Driven down out of control Victory shared with Richard Burnard Munday & Charles Dawson Booker
4 30 July 1918
@ 1000 hours
Sopwith Camel
Serial Number B7860
Pfalz D.III Driven down out of control East of Dixmude
5 1 August 1918
@ 1925 hours
Fokker D.VII Driven down out of control North of Lille
6 9 August 1918
@ 0725 hours
Fokker D.VII Destroyed Zonnebeke
7 9 August 1918
@ 0730 hours
Fokker D.VII Destroyed Southeast of Staden

Post World War I[edit]

Crundall continued working in aviation, and on 16 July 1935 was commissioned as a flying officer (class C) in the Reserve of Air Force Officers (RAFO).[10] He flew civil flights and air charter work until 1937.

World War II[edit]

In 1939 Crundall returned to active service, while remaining a Reserve Officer. He was promoted to flight lieutenant on 3 September 1940,[11] to temporary squadron leader on 1 March 1942,[12] and to war substantive squadron leader on 15 August 1942.[13] He commanded No. 116 (Calibration) Squadron until 1945,[5] and on 1 January 1945 was awarded the Air Force Cross for his efforts, by which time he was an acting-wing commander.[14]

Post World War II[edit]

After World War II, Crundall began charter airlines to French Equatorial Africa and South Africa.[15] He remained a member of the Reserve of Air Force Officers, until finally relinquishing his commission on 10 February 1954, retaining the rank of wing commander.[16] By the end of his flying career, he had accumulated over 8,500 flying hours in his pilot's log.[15] His autobiography, entitled Fighter Pilot on the Western Front, was published in 1975.[9]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b c d "Edward Crundall". The Aerodrome. 2014. Retrieved 4 November 2014. 
  2. ^ "No. 29947". The London Gazette. 16 February 1917. pp. 1649–1650. 
  3. ^ "No. 30451". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 December 1917. p. 89. 
  4. ^ "No. 30741". The London Gazette. 11 June 1918. p. 6936. 
  5. ^ a b Shores et.al. (1997), p.126.
  6. ^ "No. 31091". The London Gazette. 31 December 1918. p. 15292. 
  7. ^ "No. 31581". The London Gazette. 3 October 1919. p. 12142. 
  8. ^ "No. 13513". The Edinburgh Gazette. 14 October 1919. p. 3410. 
  9. ^ a b Shores et.al. (1997), p.127.
  10. ^ "No. 34191". The London Gazette. 20 August 1935. p. 5344. 
  11. ^ "No. 34976". The London Gazette. 22 October 1940. p. 6142. 
  12. ^ "No. 35503". The London Gazette. 27 March 1942. p. 1390. 
  13. ^ "No. 35773". The London Gazette (Supplement). 3 November 1942. p. 4810. 
  14. ^ "No. 36866". The London Gazette (Supplement). 29 December 1944. p. 58. 
  15. ^ a b Shores et.al. (1997), p.126-7.
  16. ^ "No. 40210". The London Gazette (Supplement). 18 June 1954. p. 3678. 
Bibliography
  • Shores, Christopher F.; Franks, Norman & Guest, Russell (1990). Above the Trenches: A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Air Forces 1915–1920. London, UK: Grub Street. ISBN 0-948817-19-4.