Endre Farkas

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Endre Farkas (born 1948) is a Montreal-based poet, editor and playwright born in Hajdúnánás Hungary in 1948.[1] After the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, he fled to Canada with his parents, who were Holocaust survivors.[1] When he first arrived, his given name Endre was Quebecized to André.[2] During his undergraduate degree at Concordia University he participated in the Sir George Williams affair as an occupant. He then took a few years off to live at an artist commune called Meatball Creek Farm in the Quebec Eastern Townships.[3]

Since the 1970s, he taught literature at John Abbott College in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec.[3] He retired in 2008.[2] His work has been published in six different languages: French, Spanish, Hungarian, Italian, Slovenian and Turkish.[4] He was a part of the Montreal experimental writing collective, The Vehicule Poets and was a founding editor of Véhicule Press.[5] He later founded the publishing press, The Muses’ Company.[6] He won the Quebec Writers' Federation Community Award in 2011 "for the inclusiveness and power of his vision for Quebec literature," according to QWF spokeswoman Gina Roitman.[5]

He participated in Dial-A-Poem Montreal 1985-1987.[7]

Publications[edit]

Poetry[edit]

  • Szerbusz. Montreal, QC: DaVinci Press, 1974.
  • Murders in the Welcome Café. Montreal QC: Véhicule Press, 1977.
  • Romantic at Heart & Other Faults.Montreal, QC: Cross Country Press, 1979.
  • From Here to Here, Montreal, Qc: The Muses' Company, 1980.
  • Face Off, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC: The Muses' Company, 1980
  • How To, Dorion, QC: Muses’ Company, 1988.
  • Howl Too, Eh? And Other Satires. By Endre Farkas and Ken Norris. Montreal, QC: Nuage Editions, 1991.
  • Surviving Words, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC: The Muses’ Company, 1994.
  • In the Worshipful Company of Skinners. Winnipeg, MB: Muses’ Company, 2003.
  • Quotidian Fever: New and Selected Poems, 1974-2007. Winnipeg, MB: Muses’ Company, 2007.
  • Blood Is Blood, By Endre Farkas and Carolyn Marie Souaid. Winnipeg, MB: Signature Editions, 2010.

Prose[edit]

  • Never, Again, Winnipeg, MB: Signature Editions, 2016.
  • Home Game, Winnipeg, MB: Signature Editions, 2019

Drama[edit]

  • Surviving Wor(l)ds. Winnipeg, MB: Scirocco Drama, 1999.
  • Voices. Dorian, QC: CD Poetry, 2002.

Edited[edit]

  • Montreal English Poetry of the Seventies, Endre Farkas and Ken Norris eds. Montreal, QC: Vhicule Press, 1977.
  • The Other Language: English Poetry of Montreal, Endre Farkas ed. Dorion, QC: Muses’ Company, 1989.
  • Quebec Suite: Poems for and about Quebec, Endre Farkas ed. Ste. Anne de Bellevue, QC: Muses’ Company, 1995.
  • The Collected Books of Artie Gold, Endre Farkas and Ken Norris eds. Vancouver, BC: Talonbooks, 2010.
  • Language Matters: Interviews with 22 Quebec Poets, Endre Farkas and Carolyn Marie Souaid eds. Winnipeg, MB: Signature Editions, 2013.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b https://archivalcollections.library.mcgill.ca/index.php/endre-farkas-2
  2. ^ a b Mike Boone. "Montreal poet's own words become the stuff of theatrical centennial." Montreal Gazette. February 6, 2019. https://www.pressreader.com/canada/montreal-gazette/20090206/281621006228210
  3. ^ a b "Endre Farkas, Montrealer and Véhicule Poet." Montreal Underground Origins Blog. November 25, 2015. https://www.montrealundergroundorigins.ca/endre-farkas-montrealer-and-vehicule-poet/?complete=1
  4. ^ Ian Mcgillis. Never, again: A Hungarian story with universal resonance. Montreal Gazette. February 10, 2017. https://montrealgazette.com/entertainment/books/never-again-a-hungarian-story-with-universal-resonance
  5. ^ a b John Barber. "Endre Farkas lauded by Quebec writers." The Globe and Mail. November 11, 2011. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/books-and-media/endre-farkas-lauded-by-quebec-writers/article4250720/
  6. ^ Andre Farkas and Ken Norris, eds. Montreal English Poetry of the Seventies. Montreal, QC: Véhicule Press, 1978. p. 139.
  7. ^ Ray Filip. "Lord of the Rings." Books in Canada: A National Review of Books. March 1986. p. 4. Accessed 15 August 2019.