Eowyn Ivey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Eowyn Ivey is a Pulitzer Prize finalist author. Educated at Western Washington University, Ivey was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2013 for her debut novel The Snow Child.

Life and career[edit]

Ivey was raised in Alaska. Her mother named her after Éowyn, a character from Lord of the Rings.[1]

She worked as a newspaper reporter before working as a bookseller. Her first novel The Snow Child, is set in 1920s Alaska. The book is centred around a couple called Jack and Mabel who begin seeing a girl running through the Alaskan wilderness after they sculpt a child out of snow.[1]

Her second book, To the Bright Edge of the World is set in 1885 and also in Alaska. The story is told through journal entries, military reports, letters and documents. The plot follows an expedition funded by the US government into the Alaskan wilderness.[2]

Ivey has also written essays which have appeared in publications such as The Observer, Alaska Magazine, The Sunday Times Magazine, Woman & Home,[3] and Wall Street Journal.

She lives in Alaska with her husband and two children.[4]

Recognition[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • The Snow Child (2012)
  • To the Bright Edge of the World (2016)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Eowyn Ivey on how she made The Snow Child". BBC News. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  2. ^ "To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey review – a journey into the Alaskan wilds". Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  3. ^ "bio". eowynivey.com. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  4. ^ Beckerman, Hannah (7 August 2016). "Eowyn Ivey: 'I feel like I've always been trying to understand Alaska'". The Guardian. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  5. ^ "International Author of the Year". nationalbookawards.co.uk. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  6. ^ "The Pulitzer Prizes". www.pulitzer.org. Retrieved 26 April 2017.
  7. ^ "The winners of the 2013 Indies Choice Book Awards and the E.B. White Read-Aloud Awards have been announced". aadl.org. Retrieved 26 April 2017.

External links[edit]