Frank Mazzei

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Frank Mazzei
Frank Mazzei picture.png
Mazzei in 1977
Member of the Pennsylvania Senate
from the 43rd district
In office
November 29, 1967[1] – June 2, 1975[2]
Preceded by John Devlin
Succeeded by James Romanelli
Constituency Parts of Allegheny County
Personal details
Born November 22, 1912
Greensburg, Pennsylvania[3]
Died September 27, 1977(1977-09-27) (aged 64)
Magee-Womens Hospital
Resting place Queen of Heaven Cemetery
Peters Township[4]
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Grace[4]
Children Dominic[4]
Residence Library, Pennsylvania[4]
Religion Catholic[3]

Frank Mazzei is a former Democratic member of the Pennsylvania State Senate.[5] One of his big accomplishments during his political career was creation of the Pennsylvania Lottery. In 1975 he was arrested for taking kickbacks and was jailed until 1977.

Biography[edit]

He began his career as a ward captain in the 17th ward in the South Side in Pittsburgh and later worked as a clerk and paymaster for the "Allegheny County Workhouse."[4] He served as an alternate delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1956 and 1964.[3] He was a member of the Knights of Columbus.[3]

He was elected to represent the 43rd senatorial district in the Pennsylvania State Senate in a special election in 1967.[1] He was known as a "dapper dresser" and for his monogrammed shirts.[4] He was powerful politician who rarely needed to campaign.[4] His legislative career is best known for being the main force behind the creation of the Pennsylvania Lottery.[4]

Arrest and conviction[edit]

He was convicted on federal extortion charges for taking $20,000 in kickbacks on state office in the South Side space leased to BMI Corporation.[4] He was acquitted of perjury charges in that same trial,[4] but was sentenced to 1 to 5 years in prison on others.[4] He was unanimously expelled from the Pennsylvania State Senate on June 2, 1975, making him the first person ever expelled from that chamber.[2][6] He entered federal prison in December 1975.[4]

Release[edit]

He was paroled from a federal prison facility in Missouri in Spring 1977 because he was severely stricken with cancer.[4] At the time of his death on September 27, 1977, he was awaiting a separate federal trial, with 69 co-defendants, in connection to a bail bond scheme.[4]

References[edit]