Frederick Bull (Lord Mayor of London)

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Frederick Bull (c. 1714–1784) was Lord Mayor of London and a radical politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1773 to 1784.

Frederick Bull, 1781

Early life and business[edit]

Bull was the second son of John Bull of London, and his wife Hannah. He married Judith Dickinson of Ware on 26 August 1737. From about 1744 he was a tea merchant in Leadenhall Street. He succeeded to property at Little Paxton, Huntingdonshire from his mother in 1746. He went into partnership with Samuel Moody in around 1757.[1]

Public and political career[edit]

Bull was Sheriff of London in 1771-2 and became an alderman in 1772. He became Lord Mayor of London for 1773-74.

Bull stood for the City of London at a by-election in 1773 and was returned after a hard-fought contest on 23 December 1773. He was returned for the City after a contest again in 1774 and 1780.

Bull was a Dissenter and close supporter of John Wilkes. He followed the Bill of Rights Society programme throughout his parliamentary career. His politics were radical and anti-Popery and in the spring of 1780 he supported Lord George Gordon’s Protestant crusade which led to the riots in June. [1]

Later life[edit]

Bull retired from business about 1782. He died on 10 January 1784. [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "BULL, Frederick (c.1714-84), of Leadenhall St., London". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 29 October 2017. 


Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Robert Ladbroke
Barlow Trecothick
Richard Oliver
Thomas Harley
Member of Parliament for
1773–1784
With: Barlow Trecothick 1773-1774
Thomas Harley 1773-1774
Richard Oliver 1773-1780
John Sawbridge 1774-1780
George Hayley 1774-1781
John Kirkman 1780
Nathaniel Newnham 1780-1784
John Sawbridge 1780-1784
Watkin Lewes 1781-1784
Succeeded by
Nathaniel Newnham
John Sawbridge
Watkin Lewes
Brook Watson