Bambaram

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Bambaram throwing top

Bambaram (in Tamil Nadu), Buguri (in Karnataka), Lattu لٹو (in Urdu) is a traditional throwing top used mainly in India and Pakistan.[1] In Telangana, its name is "Bongaralu Aata".[2]

Components[edit]

  • Wooden body
  • Nail tip
  • String (wrapped around the crown of the top, allowing the player to spin the top as it is thrown)

Game play[edit]

The game begins with all players holding their wound top.

The players throw their tops at the same time – this is the ‘toss’ for the game. The "toss" is decided by the top spun and picked up quickest.

The throw is triggered by a simple countdown – at the count of 1, 2, 3 all the players wind their bambarams, unwind it on the ground to rotate and then pick it up with the rope as quickly as possible. The primary skill is to use the shortest rope length usage and still make the bambaram spin, so it can be caught with the rope.

Bambarams that did not complete the toss are placed in the center of a circle. The players who finished the toss successfully try to spin the top over the tops in the circle trying to break (gunna in Karnataka slang) them and/or trying to knock them out of the circle. Each time the spinning tops have to be picked up successfully to continue.

Traditional producers[edit]

Traditional makers of Bambaram were in Ambasamudram taluk. One producer was a carpenter called Raja Gopal Achary S.His wood carving workshop wsa called Muthu Cheppu Pattarai in Kalakkad, Tirunelveli district. He started in 1961, and named his shop after his first son. His shop is run by his fourth son, Paramasivan Achary. Raja and his son Muthubalakrishnan reside in Singampathu, Kalakkad and have started a new workshop called Classic Wood Works in a prime area of Kalakkad near a bus stand.

Raja Gopal Achary

Modern use[edit]

This toy is losing popularity, however, it is still popular in rural communities. The toy has been used as a weapon in bullying due to its nail tip. Players are in many age ranges with varying sets of rules. They are sold in many regions of India. This game has been overtaken by foreign tops. Many tutorial videos describe how to spin the top.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oliver, Valerie. "History of Spin Top". www.yoyomuseum.com. Retrieved 2017-04-16. 
  2. ^ "Bambaram (பம்பரம்) - Indian Traditional Games". www.traditionalgames.in. Retrieved 2017-04-16. 

External links[edit]