Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Straight Alliance

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The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Straight Alliance
Abbreviation GLBTSA
Motto Connect. Inform. Advance.
Formation September 1974
Legal status Student organization
Purpose LGBTIQ
Headquarters University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Membership
500+
Co-Presidents
Jen Fredette, Adryen Proctor
Website studentorgs.unc.edu/glbtsa

The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Straight Alliance (GLBTSA) of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the largest LGBTIQ student organization in the Southeastern United States.[1] GLBTSA sponsors the annual Southeast Regional Unity Conference as well as Lambda Magazine, the nation's oldest LGBTIQ student publication.[2] The general body holds weekly meetings as well as guest speakers, drag shows, retreats, trips, and service projects. GLBTSA has three additional programs: Colors (monthly discussions), Committee for a Queerer Carolina (activism), and Fruit Bowl (social).

History[edit]

1974-1985: Carolina Gay Association (CGA)[edit]

The Carolina Gay Association was founded by Dan Leonard and others involved with the Duke Gay Alliance and the Human Sexuality Information and Counseling Services (HSICS) at UNC-CH.[3] On February 6, 1974, their trial organization, the Gay Awareness Rap Group, held its first meeting at the Newman Catholic Student Center. It met every Monday that spring and was predominately attended by men. In the fall they became recognized as the Carolina Gay Association, having encountered little resistance from administrators. CGA meetings were held on the first Monday of the month in Craig. Consciousness raising groups met each Tuesday evening in the Lutheran Student Center and coffeehouses were held there on some Fridays. The Social Action Committee was formed in 1975 and staged an informational picket when two men were kicked out of the He's Not Here bar in September 1975 for dancing together.[4] In April 1976, the CGA held its first Southeastern Gay Conference with hundreds in attendance, and in August 1976, the CGA printed the first copy of Lambda for "Gay Orientation Week."[5]

1985-1992: Carolina Gay and Lesbian Association (CGLA)[edit]

On February 13, 1985, the CGA voted to change its name to the Carolina Gay and Lesbian Association to make the name more inclusive of women.

During the 1987-1988 school year, two members of Student Congress, H.F. Watts and David McNeill, led an effort to defund the Carolina Gay and Lesbian Association. They collected more than the 10% of student signatures required to put a referendum on the funding of the CGLA on the spring ballot.[6]

On February 16, 1988, UNC-Chapel Hill students voted 58%-42% against funding the Carolina Gay and Lesbian Association. The referendum was non-binding, however, and only acted as a gauge of student opinion. On April 17, the newly elected Student Congress voted to continue funding the CGLA.[7]

1992-1998: Bisexuals, Gay Men, Lesbians, and Allies for Diversity (B-GLAD)[edit]

In 1992 the organization changed its name to the Bisexuals, Gay Men, Lesbians, and Allies for Diversity.[citation needed]

1998-2003: Queer Network for Change (QNC)[edit]

In 1998, B-GLAD changed its name to the Queer Network for Change in an effort to be more inclusive of transgender people.[8]


2002-2010: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender - Straight Alliance (GLBT-SA)[edit]

Two juniors, named Alice Newton and Jon Harper started the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender - Straight Alliance in the spring of 2002. The focus of GLBT-SA was to promote political activism for LGBTIQ issues on campus and throughout the state. The GLBT-SA eventually replaced the Queer Network for Change, which many believe had lost participation from straight members after it changed its name from B-GLAD.[9]

2010-2012: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Straight Alliance (GLBTSA)[edit]

On April 15, 2010, GLBT-SA voted to officially change its name to the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Straight Alliance (though the dash had fallen out of use many months prior). The change was one of many proposed by the Committee on the Future of GLBTSA, which met weekly during the spring semester to prepare for the future of the growing organization. Other notable changes included bringing back the Committee for a Queerer Carolina, expanding the social group Women Loving Women (and renaming it The Fruit Bowl), and giving the presidents of Duke University's Blue Devils United and North Carolina State University's GLBT-Community Alliance honorary, non-voting positions on the GLBTSA Executive Board.

2012–Present: Sexuality And Gender Alliance (SAGA)[edit]

In keeping with this organization's commitment to gender and sexual equality, it decided that the 2012-2013 schoolyear would mark a revolutionary change from the historical name "Gay and Lesbian" to an all-inclusive organization name. SAGA refers especially to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Pansexual, Transgender / Trans*, Queer, Questioning, Intersex, Asexual, and different-gendered populations, as well as other sexual and gender minorities.[10][11]

Southeast Regional Unity Conference[edit]

The Southeast Regional Unity Conference is the largest LGBTIQ conference in the Southeastern United States. It is hosted each spring at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Originally called the North Carolina Unity Conference, its name was changed in 2005 to the Southeast Unity Conference to reflect the growing geographic diversity of its participants.[12]

Date Theme Speakers/Performers Director(s) Attendance
April 11–13, 2003 First Unity Conference Urvashi Vaid, Loree Erickson, Mandy Carter Trevor Hoppe 120+
March 26–28, 2004 Living Below the Bible Belt: The Experiences of LGBTIQ Southerners Mab Segrest, Skott Freedman, Erik Himan, Nomy Lamm[13] Trevor Hoppe 100+
April 1–3, 2005 Queerniversity: Testing Your LGBT-IQ Suzanne Pharr, Danny Roberts, Mandy Carter, Robyn Ochs, Tranzmission Trevor Hoppe
April 7–9, 2006 Unorthodox Union: Connecting the GLBTQ and Faith Communities Mandy Carter, Rev. Irene Monroe, Staceyann Chin, S. Bear Bergman[14] Sarah C.
March 30-April 1, 2007 Outlawing Orgasm: Sex, Disease, and the Policing of Pleasure Loretta Ross, Sarwat Rumi, Patrick Califia, Robin Tyler, Andy Marra Win Chesson 400+
April 4–6, 2008 Are You Being Served?: LGBTIQ Representation in the Media Kate Bornstein, D’Lo, Mandy Carter, Magdalen Hsu-Li, Ignacio Rivera, Pam Spaulding, Craig Stephens Robert Wells 400+[15]
April 3–5, 2009 Sweet T: Transgressing, Transforming, and Transcending Gender and Sexuality in the South Tim'm T. West, Peterson Toscano, Scott Turner Schofield, Micia Mosely Haley Koch
April 9–11, 2010 Intersecting Identities: Performance, Politics, Power Kareem Khubchandani, Rev. Roger Hayes Kimberly Fisher
April 1–3, 2011 Breaking Barriers, Building Community F to Embody, Faisal Alam Rebecca Lovewell, Matthew McGibney
March 30-April 1, 2012 Crossroads: Navigating the Intersections of Our Identities F to Embody, Abby Dees, Miles Walser Sydney Borden, Camilla Brewer 200+
April 2–4, 2013 Queering the Nation Together: Creating a Safer, More Welcoming Queer Platform in Your Community Fabian Romero Sydney Borden, Camilla Brewer 100+
April 11–13, 2014 LGBT*QIA Doing Health the Right Way: Public Health and Safety in Your Community and on Campus N/A Sydney Borden, Camilla Brewer 50+
March 27–29, 2015 LGBT[ranscendence]*QIA: Opening Our Eyes, Expanding Our Horizons Mark Kleinschmidt, Julia Weldon Lauren Martin, Emily Chambliss

Previous Conferences[edit]

The Carolina Gay Association held the first Southeastern Gay Conference at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1976. The Second Annual Southeastern Gay Conference was held April 1–3, 1977.[16] In 1978, the conference moved to Atlanta, GA. It returned to Chapel Hill, NC in 1979 with over 600 people in attendance.[17]

On March 25–27, 1983, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill held the first North Carolina Gay and Lesbian Conference. The theme for the conference was "Survival in a Hostile Environment."[18] The second annual North Carolina Gay and Lesbian Conference was held March 30-April 1, 1984, at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, NC.[4] In 1985 the Southeastern Gay Conference returned to Chapel Hill for its tenth anniversary. The conference was held April 11–14, 1985, and themed "Here Today and Here to Stay."[17]

Lambda Magazine[edit]

Started in 1976, Lambda is the oldest LGBTIQ student publication in the United States.[2][dead link] It has always been a product of the LGBTIQ student organization at UNC-CH and is currently a semesterly publication of the GLBTSA.

Mission statement[edit]

"LAMBDA is UNC-Chapel Hill's Lesbian-, Gay-, Bisexual-, Transgender-, Intersex- and Queer-affirming publication, providing a progressive outlet for news, analysis, opinion and dialogue. As such, we are inherently committed to a feminist, anti-racist and historically conscious perspective in pursuit of social justice for all people."[2][dead link]

Awards[edit]

The Front Page awarded Lambda its 1983 Media Award for "Best Gay Newsletter". This appeared in The Front Page's March 27, 1984 issue.[19] (The Front Page was a North Carolina gay newspaper founded in 1979 that merged with Q-Notes in 2006.)[20][21]

Other programs[edit]

Committee for a Queerer Carolina[edit]

The Committee for a Queerer Carolina is an activist group formed in the spring of 2004 in response to the conservative Committee for a Better Carolina.[22]

Fruit Bowl[edit]

Formerly Women Loving Women (WLW), Fruit Bowl is a weekly social initiative.

Cross-Campus Initiatives[edit]

Since the fall of 2009, GLBTSA has increasingly worked with students at Duke University and North Carolina State University. On February 12–14, 2010, the three universities held a joint retreat at the Chestnut Ridge Camp and Retreat Center in Efland, North Carolina. Another retreat is planned for November 2010.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.dailytarheel.com/content/lgbt-advocate-guide-ranks-unc-top-100[dead link]
  2. ^ a b c https://web.archive.org/web/20100527202326/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/aboutus.htm. Archived from the original on May 27, 2010. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ http://docsouth.unc.edu/sohp/K-0848/K-0848.html. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ a b (PDF) https://web.archive.org/web/20121012075317/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/archives/1984/march.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ (PDF) https://web.archive.org/web/20121012113541/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/archives/1976/augustorientation.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ (PDF) https://web.archive.org/web/20121012113647/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/archives/1987/december.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. ^ (PDF) https://web.archive.org/web/20121012113727/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/archives/1988/april.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ InterVarsity controversy: http://www.ibiblio.org/cr/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/2003_02.pdf[dead link]
  9. ^ http://www.dailytarheel.com/content/lgbt-community-allies-join-forces[dead link]
  10. ^ "UNC-CH SAGA (SAGA_UNC) on Twitter". Twitter.com. Retrieved 2013-11-01. 
  11. ^ "Sexuality and Gender Alliance - Home". Uncstudentorgs.collegiatelink.net. Retrieved 2013-11-01. 
  12. ^ "Interview with a UNC'er about the GLBT-SA | trevorade: freshly squeezed gay analysis!". Trevorhoppe.com. 2005-12-06. Retrieved 2013-11-01. 
  13. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20121012113518/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/articles/27/1/unity.htm. Archived from the original on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  14. ^ "UT Lambda Student Union members attend Unity Conference | Out & About Nashville". Outandaboutnewspaper.com. Retrieved 2013-11-01. 
  15. ^ (PDF) https://web.archive.org/web/20111009184809/http://www.southernersonnewground.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/Southern-LGBT-Map-Directory.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 9, 2011. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  16. ^ (PDF) https://web.archive.org/web/20121012075140/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/archives/1977/marchapril.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  17. ^ a b (PDF) https://web.archive.org/web/20121012075448/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/archives/1984/novdec.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  18. ^ (PDF) https://web.archive.org/web/20121012075226/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/archives/1983/march.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  19. ^ (PDF) https://web.archive.org/web/20121012075348/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/archives/1984/aprilmay.pdf. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  20. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20080311093140/http://www.iveybanks.com/Press/Articles/QueerType.htm. Archived from the original on March 11, 2008. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  21. ^ Bradley J. Ward. "Q-Notes Online". Goqnotes.com. Retrieved 2013-11-01. 
  22. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20121012075101/http://www.unc.edu/glbtsa/lambda/articles/28/1/maturity.htm. Archived from the original on October 12, 2012. Retrieved 2013-11-01.  Missing or empty |title= (help)

External links[edit]